unchanging


Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to unchanging: unhurried

un·chang·ing

 (ŭn-chān′jĭng)
adj.
Remaining the same; showing or undergoing no change: unchanging weather patterns; unchanging friendliness.

un·chang′ing·ly adv.
un·chang′ing·ness n.

unchanging

(ʌnˈtʃeɪndʒɪŋ)
adj
remaining the same; constant: an unchanging nature.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unchanging - conforming to the same principles or course of action over time
consistent - (sometimes followed by `with') in agreement or consistent or reliable; "testimony consistent with the known facts"; "I have decided that the course of conduct which I am following is consistent with my sense of responsibility as president in time of war"- FDR
2.unchanging - showing little if any change; "a static population"
unchangeable - not changeable or subject to change; "a fixed and unchangeable part of the germ plasm"-Ashley Montagu; "the unchangeable seasons"; "one of the unchangeable facts of life"

unchanging

unchanging

adjective
1. Remaining continually unchanged:
2. Having no change or variation:
Translations

unchanging

[ʌnˈtʃeɪndʒɪŋ] ADJinalterable, inmutable

unchanging

[ˌʌnˈtʃeɪndʒɪŋ] adjimmuable

unchanging

unchanging

[ʌnˈtʃeɪndʒɪŋ] adjche resta immutato/a
References in classic literature ?
She rose with the same unchanging smile with which she had first entered the room- the smile of a perfectly beautiful woman.
There lay the fixed threads of the warp subject to but one single, ever returning, unchanging vibration, and that vibration merely enough to admit of the crosswise interblending of other threads with its own.
His piercing look was fixed in vain on the satirical face of the Gascon and the unchanging countenance of Porthos.
These were well preserved and unchanging; one and all they are the same: cold, selfish, dominant, reckless of consequences in pursuit of their own will.
To the tranquil night and its starry magnificence succeeded the unchanging daylight and the blazing rays of the sun; and, from the earliest dawn, the temperature became scorching.
My dear girl told me that night how Richard's being thereafter prosperous or ruined, befriended or deserted, could only make this difference to her, that the more he needed love from one unchanging heart, the more love that unchanging heart would have to give him; how he thought of her through his present errors, and she would think of him at all times--never of herself if she could devote herself to him, never of her own delights if she could minister to his.
Although her unchanging black dress was in every plait precisely as of old, and her unchanging attitude was rigidly preserved, a very slight additional setting of her features and contraction of her gloomy forehead was so powerfully marked, that it marked everything about her.
There was a fierce pride and defiance in every line of her face, in every curve of the flexible lip, in every motion of her body; but in her eye was a deep, settled night of anguish,--an expression so hopeless and unchanging as to contrast fearfully with the scorn and pride expressed by her whole demeanor.
One knows it sometimes when one gets up at the tender solemn dawn-time and goes out and stands alone and throws one's head far back and looks up and up and watches the pale sky slowly changing and flushing and marvelous unknown things happening until the East almost makes one cry out and one's heart stands still at the strange unchanging majesty of the rising of the sun--which has been happening every morning for thousands and thousands and thousands of years.
So unchanging was the dull old house, the yellow light in the darkened room, the faded spectre in the chair by the dressing-table glass, that I felt as if the stopping of the clocks had stopped Time in that mysterious place, and, while I and everything else outside it grew older, it stood still.
Dantes reflected, as he worked, on the shout of joy which, with a single word, he could evoke from all these men, if he gave utterance to the one unchanging thought that pervaded his heart; but, far from disclosing this precious secret, he almost feared that he had already said too much, and by his restlessness and continual questions, his minute observations and evident pre-occupation, aroused suspicions.
The Abbot, from his point of vantage, looked down on the two long lines of faces, placid and sun-browned for the most part, with the large bovine eyes and unlined features which told of their easy, unchanging existence.