uncharm

uncharm

(ʌnˈtʃɑːm)
vb (tr)
1. to remove an enchantment from; to free from the influence of a spell or charm; disenchant
2. to remove magical properties or powers from (a charm, spell); to negate the power of (a spell)
3. to remove the ability to charm or attract; to render less charming
References in classic literature ?
748-749) Take nothing to eat or to wash with from uncharmed pots, for in them there is mischief.
But Jordan's enlargement of his uncharmed circle does not end there: if Maria becomes his soul mate, Pilars group becomes his surrogate family, an acquisition accelerated by the intensity of their few days together.
Unfortunately, Padre is initially uncharmed by el tigre, but all the children agree to a pre adoption task of naming the tiger.
In London, most critics praised the production's skill and the English cast's energy, though some were left uncharmed, including the Daily Mail critic, who "tired of it after 10 minutes." The Guardian called it "mildly amusing."
Instead, an uncharmed passage down Tattenham Hill and a lost shoe in the straight conspired against his chances at Epsom, and a disappointing defeat in the Irish equivalent saw him pass into 2012 as another expectant beneficiary of Stoute's legendary knack with older horses that have yet to reach their peak.
With single-word substitutions--such as the change from the commonplace assertion that Rosalind lives "unharmed" by Cupid's bow (1.139) to the more original "uncharmed" in Q2--it is impossible to be sure whether we are witnessing a compositor reaching for the more obvious word when setting up Q1, or the author tinkering with the manuscript underlying Q2.
Dumbo about the same time to gestate its animated baby elephant with large flapping ears: in both cases, I find myself uncharmed by the idea that cuteness ameliorates catastrophic birth defects.
Life is chancy, a charmed sequence of things that happened, as opposed to the uncharmed sequence of things that might have happened but didn't.
The folks at online magazines such as Feed, Suck and Salon were decidedly uncharmed when Kinsley pronounced most of what appeared on the Web to be "crap." (He defends the statement by noting that most of what appears on paper is also crap.) When the magazine kept pushing back its plans to start charging readers, writers both on- and offline breathed a sigh of relief: Perhaps the future might be postponed a while longer.
A Marxist law professor writing about The Problems of Jurisprudence was uncharmed, but Posner had evidently softened, or grown, enough that the professor could not help but wonder if Posner hoped to stake out ground as a "centrist jurisprude, appropriate perhaps for a Republican nomination to the Supreme Court.
I've never met a natural writer in this business who wasn't, or just a good one who was left uncharmed or uneducated by Mencken's prose; it's the pettifoggers and pedestrians whom the Sage of Baltimore irritates to this day.
Some residents, objecting to manipulation by developers, became uncharmed with BCTC.