unchildlike

unchildlike

(ʌnˈtʃaɪldˌlaɪk)
adj
not childlike; uncharacteristic of a child; not resembling a child
References in classic literature ?
There had always been a strange unchildlike air about Hannah, but in certain ways she now appeared older than aunt Jane --soberer, and more settled.
Quite her sad, unchildlike expression, and thin little face, with the big dark eyes."
The little stratagems she had devised to try him, the little tokens he had given in his childish way--not of dulness but of something infinitely worse, so ghastly and unchildlike in its cunning--came back as vividly as if but yesterday had intervened.
He suddenly fancied that her long black eyelashes were quivering, as though the lids were opening and a sly crafty eye peeped out with an unchildlike wink, as though the little girl were not asleep, but pretending.
I could not forget your conduct to me, Jane--the fury with which you once turned on me; the tone in which you declared you abhorred me the worst of anybody in the world; the unchildlike look and voice with which you affirmed that the very thought of me made you sick, and asserted that I had treated you with miserable cruelty.
NON-FICTION LAST WITNESSES: UNCHILDLIKE STORIES BY SVETLANA ALEXIEVICH, PENGUIN MODERN CLASSICS, PS12.99, EBOOK PS9.49 HHHH H THE awarding of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Literature has led to English translations of Svetlana Alexievich's oral histories.
NON-FICTION Last Witnesses: Unchildlike Stories by Svetlana Alexievich HHHHH The awarding of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Literature has led to English translations of Svetlana Alexievich's oral histories.
NON-FICTION LAST WITNESSES: UNCHILDLIKE STORIES BY SVETLANA ALEXIEVICH The testimonies gathered from those who were children in the USSR during the Second World War are each no more than a few pages long and are presented without editorial comment.
They are 'unchildlike' stories in that they all tell of lost childhood and lost innocence, from children seeing or inflicting death for the first time, to the traumas left by war.
They are "unchildlike" stories in that they all tell of lost childhood and lost innocence, from children seeing or inflicting death for the first time, to the traumas left by war.
The "unchildlike boys" are those boys who are a product of abuse and engage the "notion that victimized and abused children are not only endangered, but are made dangerous" (191).
(66) This allows cross-examiners to easily characterise a child witness as 'the aggressor', 'unchildlike', 'less than innocent', confused or unreliable.