unclassical

unclassical

(ʌnˈklæsɪkəl)
adj
not classical
References in periodicals archive ?
Soviet choreographers searching for a new dance style to match the new social order threw some very unclassical acrobatic moves at the dancers--steps like splits and high leg extensions which until that point were considered inappropriate.
Unclassical Traditions: Alternatives to the Classical Past in Late Antiquity, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 119-130.
THIS BOOK HAS A BEAUTIFULLY SPARE and classic title, meant to remind us of Cicero's De Amicitia, but it makes a thoroughly unclassical argument.
In particular, the analysis of the bacchanalian motif in the opening epigram and its parallel to the epigrams themselves (203-09) stresses the very unclassical aesthetic at work in these preHochklassik years.
Furthermore, it is easier to extend wireless communication systems in those unclassical environments.
Under the influence of Aramaic and other factors, Hebrew continued to decline in the post-exilic period, according to this theory, until by the CE period the Mishnaic Hebrew of the Rabbis represents a thoroughly unclassical form of Hebrew, perhaps an Aramaised form of Hebrew.
A trifle of fifteen years' seniority and a husband complicate matters, but it was not till after the reckless expenditure of a Horatian ode upon an unclassical mistress that he gave up hope.
The result was not self-confession or revelation; the result, strangely enough, was a swollen manuscript in which the world around him was reproduced in a totally unclassical, unromantic, un-European way.
Columella resists, he proclaims, because of her bad grammar: "[I]t is her cursed, vulgar, unclassical language, that disgusts me to the last degree.
The adjustment of the sexual passion to the love of virtue is for Jane Austen the central question, as it is for Rousseau, and the wholly unclassical expectation of these novels is that one's beloved will be one's best friend or that marriage itself is the essential friendship.
Even when Rembrandt adopts the model of Rubens and the ultimate source in antique statuary for his imagery, such as the 1636 Susannah (1636; The Hague), he shows the figure isolated and vulnerable as well, subject now to the gaze of the (male) viewer and emphatically unclassical in her anatomy and proportions.
They make Shakespeare resemble a French classic, when what makes Shakespeare a classic is so definitively unclassical.