uncloister

uncloister

(ʌnˈklɔɪstə)
vb (tr)
literary to free from confinement of any kind
References in periodicals archive ?
"'Uncloister'd Virtue': Adam and Eve in Milton's Paradise." Milton Studies 3 (1971): 119-37.
This is how Saint Vincent de Paul regarded the community of women who served the poor, uncloistered, but religious.
(56) Exodus uncloisters this ethic, broadening its applicability by inviting lay listeners to heed the teaching and join the fold of the humble.
The name was given because of their interaction with the lower classes; as uncloistered nuns, they defied socially acceptable behaviour for proper women.
For Merton, the monastic life was not an escape or refuge from the modern city but a prophetic form of spirituality that he continually offered to the urban uncloistered time and time again.
The Daughters of Charity were an uncloistered women's religious order that took annual (rather than perpetual) vows to serve the poor.
So too, when Femi begins to woo Zodwa, her questions about him being too tall, too slick or possibly a drug dealer are uncloistered opportunities for them to know each other better, not for xenophobic hate.
She educated young girls, the poor, and Native Americans, and developed one of the first uncloistered religious communities in the Catholic church.
The sermons that he preaches on evangelical poverty, studied by Michael Robson, illustrated how the Franciscan ethos enabled him to transform monastic values within a larger, uncloistered world.
(19) This uncloistered order had only received final approval from the Vatican in that year, whilst de Lacy was not yet a postulant.
Novel legal problems need not take [a judge] by storm if he makes a little advance, uncloistered inquiry into what people most want out of their lives and how they wish to live with one another.