uncoercive

uncoercive

(ˌʌnkəʊˈɜːsɪv)
adj
not coercive; not tending to coerce
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References in periodicals archive ?
1988) (forcing the board to redeem the pill to permit shareholders to accept an uncoercive cash tender offer that the board considered inadequate); City Capital Assocs.
But before turning to their contributions, I wish to address one point made by Spivak that has stuck with me over the years: her longstanding commitment to thinking through the possibilities of education in the humanities understood as an uncoercive rearrangement of desires.
("We hold today that a suspect who has once responded to unwarned yet uncoercive questioning is not thereby disabled from waiving his rights and confessing after he has been given the requisite Miranda warnings."); see also Defense Brief, supra note 3, at 22-23; Government Brief, supra note 5, at 58.
This deep double bind within democracy itself has to be learned by way of the intuitions of a regionalism transmitted in education--an uncoercive rearrangement of desire--as well as research and cultural work.
In a recent essay, Righting Wrongs, Gayatn Spivak responds to the tendencies identified by Weber and Giroux by arguing precisely for an "uncoercive" style of reading, for a strategic pedagogy that can (re)make the American university "available for global social justice." We must work to "unmoor" the academy "from its elite safe [secure] harbors," Spivak says, and create instead "an expanded definition of a 'Humanities to Come' " (2004, 526).
According to Nisbet, "inequality is the source of both social instability and cultural decay"; he restates Rousseau's view that originally, "mankind lived in a condition of natural simplicity, one in which human relationships were unforced and uncoercive, in which morality sprang from what is ingrained in us by nature" but for "the discovery of the idea of private property" (Nisbet 1982: 38).
O'Connor vigorously insists, of course, that her characters are nothing other than the free creatures of the uncoercive God: "(M)an is so free that with his last breath he can say No" (Mystery 182).
Humanities pedagogy, says Spivak, 'attempts an uncoercive rearrangement of desires' through the 'textured' work of languages.
439, 449 (1988) (refusing free exercise claim, despite significant interference with religious practices, because state action uncoercive); Bowen v.
In the humanities classroom begins a training for what may produce a criticism that can possibly engage a public sphere deeply hostile to the mission of the humanities when they are understood as the persistent attempt to an uncoercive rearrangement of desires, through teaching reading.
If teaching is indeed about the "uncoercive rearrangement of desires" (Chakravorty 41), as Gayatri Spivak has famously suggested, then how are our desires being rearranged at the current moment?
For her, as for many of us who were teaching in those years, the classroom became a primary locus of hope, a possible model for a cross-generational, collaborative, uncoercive, loving community of learners which might be transferrable to the larger social order.