uncompelled


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uncompelled

(ˌʌnkəmˈpɛld)
adj
1. (of a person) not acting under compulsion
2. (of an act) not done under compulsion; voluntary
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uncompelled

adjective
Done by one's own choice:
References in periodicals archive ?
publishers often paid legally uncompelled honoraria or royalties to
Servant leaders tend to regard their followers to be supportive and responsible fellows and consider them in an egalitarian manner, encouraging followers' communion aim and stimulating them to become more uncompelled and caring to their customers (Popescu, 2016; 2014; 2013), and influencing frontline workers to manifest more citizenship behaviors.
informed choice uncompelled by network effects, be allowed to return to
Often times [sic], Randy has his head down for the entire period and he always seems tired and uncompelled to do any work.
Hobbes believed that foolish self-interest always threatens uncompelled cooperation when one can gain by abandoning a joint effort.
Uncompelled contract renegotiations are a normal feature of every-day commercial relationships, There are many possible contractual re-arrangements possible, such as a lump-sum payment in return for contract terminations or lengthening contract terms in exchange for a decrease in prices.
Hence, their uncompelled imitation is confined to shaping themselves, not the city or other people.
This is possible, compatibilists contend, because as long as we act according to our uncompelled preferences, we are effectively exercising free will.
Stoicism holds that the only things in our power are our opinions and our choices, and therefore "the highest employment of life is 'the Care of [our] own Faculty of Choice; how to render it undisturbed, unrestrained, uncompelled, free' " (McCarthy 52).
The important consideration is only that the confession is uncoerced, uncompelled, and voluntary.
168) This is the ressourcement of uncompelled and uncompelling radical Christianity.
There are three camps in this debate: hard determinism (the belief that there is no free will and that everything that happens has been caused and that we simply act according to a plan), soft determinism (the assumption that causality does not imply compulsion and that our choices are uncompelled because they are willfully acted upon), and indeterminism (this view establishes that genuine freedom requires real choices).