uncompelling

uncompelling

(ˌʌnkəmˈpɛlɪŋ)
adj
1. not arousing interest or demanding attention; not gripping
2. not compelling or persuasive; unconvincing
References in periodicals archive ?
But it also underscored how uncompelling Trump's agenda is even in a die-hard conservative state.
I may be overstating, but there can be no simple contrast between the appealing but morally unprincipled Sebastian and the virtuous but uncompelling Charlemont.
Arbus is possibly the closest thing America has to Kafka, a profound ironist who simply did not see the world in conventional terms and was - when you strip away the nice-making, the wheedling for money or support and the expressions of garden-variety depression - incapable of saying anything uncompelling.
While the venue accentuates the uncompelling gestalts of several pieces, the spectrum of identities and heritages woven into the works en masse creates a sense of buoyancy, as if this were some utopian academy.
In the Lanete case, the Fourth Division said it found the evidence uncompelling.
Five uncompelling photos pictured campus life, none with captions, which could have been used to make a point.
As concepts go it's no dafter than most and better than some but the opera remains dramatically uncompelling and ends in bathos with a restored Orlando not pulling on his armour but his socks.
Ulster are tempting with an eight-point start but have an uncompelling away record while the hosts have the strongerlooking bench.
For advocates of small government and privatization, the public sector contractions in big cities like Long Beach might be uncompelling news--simply a necessary transition in reaching higher efficiencies.
It is perhaps a little hypocritical to parade such incidents as uncompelling empirical anomalies and also as compelling methodological counterexamples, but even the staunchest enemies of methodological naturalism have to admit that there is a question here for deductivists to ponder.
This reading position does not align neatly with Howells's model of distant critics' interpretive play--it is too invested in local contents that European readers find uncompelling, in her account--or with Appiah's model of the cosmopolitan reader's imaginative moral concern, although in some respects it approaches more closely to the latter.