uncomprehensive

Related to uncomprehensive: thesaurus

uncomprehensive

(ˌʌnˌkɒmprɪˈhɛnsɪv)
adj
1. not inclusive or comprehensive
2. archaic lacking in understanding or comprehension
3. archaic impossible to understand; incomprehensible
References in periodicals archive ?
"It is true that we are teenagers with incomplete and uncomprehensive understanding of politics, but as we have heard from Europeans, France is the country of freedom and the cradle of democracy," it said.
As we know, the searching region is determined by the explosion amplitude and fireworks with poor quality have bigger amplitude, which may lead to an uncomprehensive search without considering the cooperation with other fireworks.
Either you find it smart, witty and hilarious, or confusing and uncomprehensive. Either way, you need to know about Oum Salloum - apparently a famous Emirati character - in order to relate to the story.
Finds bottom in the uncomprehensive deeps, Keeps place with thought and almost, like the gods, Does thoughts unveil in their dumb cradles.
So why the feigned surprise this week when a very uncomprehensive BBC poll put UK town hall job losses at 25,000 (they are, in fact likely to be 10 times that number).
Here at Walton Very Uncomprehensive School we believe in creating a well-rounded child, which is why you'll find our child existing on a strict diet of jam doughnuts.
Although I cannot use valuable space to address these charges in terms provided by specific critics, the reader can find these criticisms spelled-out in the following, uncomprehensive list of sociological works: Alexander (1991), Antonio (1991), Bergesen (1993), Bologh and Mell (1994), Collins (1992), Faia (1993), Fuchs and Ward (1994a; 1994b), Giddens (1987), Lembcke (1993), Lemert (1994), Lewis, et.
Not only in his geographically patchy and uncomprehensive account of the plague's activities, but in his general approach to so inexplicable a disaster, his may be a minimalist new.
With regard to the detailed, though uncomprehensive, `Guide to concordances', I will only mention that the volte originally entitled `Cor.' (48) shares a similar opening phrase with one by Jacob Reys in Lord Herbert of Cherbury's lute book, f.68.
I would argue that whatever looks like a new mode of life was unintegrated and uncomprehensive. And the effort to create one was half-hearted.
All in all, Contemporary American Fiction is an unambitious, uncomprehensive survey of (for the most part) |plain' realists, who are (for the most part) plainly less |plain' and altogether more ambitious than Hornby indicates.