unconforming

unconforming

(ˌʌnkənˈfɔːmɪŋ)
adj
not conforming
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References in periodicals archive ?
In my experience, every family has a rebel in its ranks, the wacky wayward one who may be a boisterous brother, an unconforming uncle, a shout-out-loud sister or audacious aunty.
'Many a time, a woman's dressing is not only commented in a derogatory manner, but she is always made to be the offender instead because of her unconforming dressing and/or behaviour.
During the time when Scandinavians dominated northern and central England in the Middle Ages, oddi was presumably borrowed into English, though it is first recorded only in 14th-century Middle English as the adjective odde meaning "without a corresponding mate." At about the same time it was used with the meaning of an odd number or it could also mean "unconforming, irregular," though in reference to people it usually meant "outstanding, illustrious." The modern sense of "peculiar, eccentric" did not become widely used before the 17th century.
But open people tend to be less down to earth, irritatingly unconforming and unpredictable.
Sebald's bachelors; queer resistance and the unconforming life.