uncounselled

uncounselled

(ʌnˈkaʊnsəld)
adj
lacking counsel
References in periodicals archive ?
To be sure, the Court has made clear that an outstanding uncounselled felony conviction cannot reliably be used for certain purposes.
"The shortage is as bad as it's ever been and when the wait is so long to get access to a donor it just pushes it underground again and people seek their own remedy using uncounselled, unconsented donors and unquarantined sperm," he said.
The anxiety of the counselled patients was significantly less than Uncounselled ones, especially their anxiety about bodily mutilation and guilt.
1 ("This Rule contributes to the proper functioning of the legal system by protecting a person who has chosen to be represented by a lawyer in a matter against possible overreaching by other lawyers who are participating in the matter, interference by those lawyers with the client-lawyer relationship and the uncounselled disclosure of information relating to the representation.").
Promulgated to "prevent lawyers from taking advantage of uncounselled laypersons and to preserve the integrity of the lawyer-client relationship," the rule has been cited and elaborated on by courts innumerable.[8] However, in recent years, the rule has come under attack from the Department of Justice, and not completely without good cause.
exiled women and uncounselled women once fled, they no longer
The most critical issue, which is never fully addressed until the last chapter, is the extent to which Charles I was indeed uncounselled or unwilling to accept counsel.
The book demonstrates, however, that except for the few months after the Prayer Book's introduction in July 1637 (when Charles's deafness to Edinburgh indeed let a crisis develop), the king was not "uncounselled": indeed, Donald shows how fully Charles had before him the arguments for concession.
On the difficulties of governing England and Scotland, see PETER DONALD, AN UNCOUNSELLED KING: CHARLES I AND THE SCOTTISH TROUBLES, 1637-1641, at 3-4 (1990).