uncouth


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un·couth

 (ŭn-ko͞oth′)
adj.
1. Crude; unrefined.
2. Awkward or clumsy; ungraceful.
3. Archaic Foreign; unfamiliar.

[Middle English, unknown, strange, from Old English uncūth : un-, not; see un-1 + cūth, known; see gnō- in Indo-European roots.]

un·couth′ly adv.
un·couth′ness n.

uncouth

(ʌnˈkuːθ)
adj
lacking in good manners, refinement, or grace
[Old English uncūth, from un-1 + cūth familiar; related to Old High German kund known, Old Norse kunnr]
unˈcouthly adv
unˈcouthness n

un•couth

(ʌnˈkuθ)

adj.
1. lacking manners or grace; clumsy; oafish.
2. rude, uncivil, or boorish: uncouth language.
3. strange and ungraceful in appearance or form.
[before 900; Middle English: unfamiliar, unknown; Old English uncūth=un- un-1 + cūth known, c. Old High German chund, Old Norse kunnr; orig. past participle of can1]
un•couth′ly, adv.
un•couth′ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.uncouth - lacking refinement or cultivation or tasteuncouth - lacking refinement or cultivation or taste; "he had coarse manners but a first-rate mind"; "behavior that branded him as common"; "an untutored and uncouth human being"; "an uncouth soldier--a real tough guy"; "appealing to the vulgar taste for violence"; "the vulgar display of the newly rich"
unrefined - (used of persons and their behavior) not refined; uncouth; "how can a refined girl be drawn to such an unrefined man?"

uncouth

uncouth

adjective
Translations

uncouth

[ʌnˈkuːθ] ADJ (= unrefined) → grosero, inculto; (= clumsy) → torpe, desmañado

uncouth

[ʌnˈkuːθ] adjgrossier/ière, fruste

uncouth

adj personungehobelt, ordinär; behaviourunflätig, ungehobelt; mannersungeschliffen, ungehobelt; expression, wordunflätig, unfein; it’s very uncouth to eat with your handses ist sehr unfein, mit den Fingern zu essen

uncouth

[ʌnˈkuːθ] adj (old) → maleducato/a, rozzo/a, villano/a
References in classic literature ?
She had not seemed uncouth to him then; but now, in the change that had come over her, he knew that such she had been; yet no more uncouth than he, and he was still uncouth.
But when the nurse saw his uncouth face and full beard, she was afraid and sprang up and fled and left the child.
I shall not copy the uncouth language, full of needless repetitions (and, if I know anything of the subject, not guiltless of bad grammar as well), in which my innocent husband was solemnly and falsely accused of poisoning his first wife.
An uncouth black figure of a man, a figure of no particular import, hung over the taffrail against the starlight, and I found Montgomery was speaking to me.
But beauty, in our sense of the word, seems to diminish as we go down: the creature becomes more--I won't say 'ugly' of any of God's creatures--more uncouth.
He taught certain uncouth lads, when they were of an age to enter society, the intricacies of contra dances, or the steps of the schottische and mazurka, and he was a marked figure in all social assemblies, though conspicuously absent from town-meetings and the purely masculine gatherings at the store or tavern or bridge.
I shall call hills steep, which ought to be bold; surfaces strange and uncouth, which ought to be irregular and rugged; and distant objects out of sight, which ought only to be indistinct through the soft medium of a hazy atmosphere.
With a cry John seized the branch of a tree, whipped the crutch out of his armpit, and sent that uncouth missile hurtling through the air.
The ceremony made use of at the reception of a stranger is somewhat unusual; as soon as he enters, all the courtiers strike him with their cudgels till he goes back to the door; the amity then subsisting between us did not secure me from this uncouth reception, which they told me, upon my demanding the reason of it, was to show those whom they treated with that they were the bravest people in the world, and that all other nations ought to bow down before them.
The various bands of Captain Bonneville's company had now been assembled for some time at the rendezvous; they had had their fill of feasting, and frolicking, and all the species of wild and often uncouth merrymaking, which invariably take place on these occasions.
It was in vain that Kory-Kory tempted me with food, or lighted my pipe, or sought to attract my attention by performing the uncouth antics that had sometimes diverted me.
He disliked the fisher folk, who were rough, uncouth, and went to chapel.