uncreate

(redirected from uncreating)

uncreate

(ˌʌnkrɪˈeɪt)
vb (tr)
to dismantle or unmake
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Boyle/Paul Velery: Le passage des reves: "Ladormouse," "Les pas," "Le sylphe," "A l'aurore." Lori Laitman/Joan Joffe Hall: The Joy of Uncreating: "Illumination," "The Joy of Uncreating." Jake Heggie/Vachel Lindsay: Of Laughter and Farewell: "Under the Blessing of your Psyche Wings," "By the Spring, at Sunset." Jennifer Higdon/Walt Whitman: "Lilacs." Glen Roven/Christine Rosetti: "Remember."
Following her argument, my aim here will be to discuss how Metres' "(echo / ex/)" poems, by enacting on the level of form the unmaking of torture, can be read as "an appropriation, aping, and reversing of the action of" uncreating. A reversing that, through its poetic making, becomes a remaking of the tortured prisoners of Abu Ghraib.
The impulse to anatomize texts critically, to uncover and lay bare everything until a text is as dormant as anything on a coroner's table, was probably the inevitable result of several decades of unmasking, unmasking without remaking, uncreating without creating.
We are "uncreating." We--or rather, some of us--have become the "uncreators." (3) One young and dangerous species has become a threat to Earth's life-generating capacity.
uncreat[ing] themselves into existence." (19) When they succeed at this "uncreating" and the Mennonite text is in effect no longer recognizable as a "Mennonite" text, what then?
There does not seem to be an equivalent concept in English, although the closest might be something along the lines of "uncreating." The point here is that even though a person may have once formed painful images, memories, beliefs, or what have you, we counselors are not taught that we can directly unmake, unform, uncreate, undo, or deconstruct them psychologically.
This was the vision of Pope's Dunciad in reporting the decision of "the big forces" of his time to follow the ways of destruction and of the uncreating word of irrationalism.
creative ("Light dies before thine uncreating word" [214]),
These 'uncreating words' point to a surprising relationship between language and the world: shimmering at 'the edge of meaning' (p.
is restor'd; Light dies before thy uncreating word: Thy hand, great Anarch!
Is restored; Light dies before thy uncreating word: Thy hand, great Anarch!
It has been said that Donne's satires tell "us more about the satirist than the thing satirized" and that "Satyre II" in particular tells us that Donne's "aim (or fantasy)" was "to stand clear of the religious, political, and social pressures of his world." (1) For others, Donne's legal satire is so extensive that it borders on philosophical abstraction: it is "a writerly expose of a crisis in Law in the most comprehensive sense"; its villain Coscus is "a sort of Uncreating Word," a veritable embodiment of "the protean nature of words." (2) One final, related view holds that Donne satirized lawyerly ethics--or the lack thereof--but not anything peculiar to late Elizabethan law itself.