uncustomed

uncustomed

(ʌnˈkʌstəmd)
adj
1. archaic contrary to custom
2. (of goods) having an outstanding custom or duty payment
References in periodicals archive ?
After perusing their files, the DPP said he was convinced there was sufficient evidence to charge the suspects with being in possession of uncustomed goods, counterfeit excise stamps, tax evasion and fraud, all amounting to more than S1 billion.The items were confiscated from the factory in February during a raid by a multi-agency team.
He said the company has been receiving uncustomed ethanol for alcohol production, and not properly accounting for manufacture of its excisable products.
Mohd Yusoff said the case is being investigated under Section 135(1)(e) of the Customs Act 1967 for transporting uncustomed goods.
Mindful of the fact that our territorial borders are porous, smugglers are known, since the establishment of Customs in 1839, to have been bringing in uncustomed and contraband goods, using both the land and sea, to facilitate the illegal trade practice.
house" where uncustomed goods were suspected of being.
Patients usually present early hours in the morning or after rest following heavy uncustomed exercise or a high carbohydrate meal.
(205.) Compare Drayton, supra note 199, at 10 (describing the power of an officer to "take and carry away, whatever he shall in his pleasure deem uncustomed goods"), and Father OP Candor, A Letter Concerning Libels, Warrants, the Seizure of Papers, and Sureties for the Peace of Behavior (London, J.
A warrant must "particularly describ[e] the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." (21) The Framers of the Fourth Amendment were concerned with preventing the practice of general warrants used in England, as well as the related writs of assistance in the Colonies, which authorized the Crown's customs officers to rummage through the homes of colonists and seize prohibited or uncustomed goods.
If [the officer] shall have cause to suspect a concealment [of uncustomed goods], in any particular dwelling-house, store, building, or other place, [he] shall, upon application on oath or affirmation to any justice of the peace, be entitled to a warrant to enter such house, store or other place (in the day time only) and there to search for such goods....
(173) According to Davies, "the successful seizure of uncustomed goods was not enough to justify the house search; the justification for the house search depended on compliance with the writ of assistance." (174) The first problem with Davies's conclusion is that the successful-search immunity defense was never at issue because the search had been unsuccessful.
(51) For example, the Act of Frauds of 1662 authorized customs officers "to enter, and go into any House, Shop, Cellar, Warehouse or Room, or other Place, and in Case of Resistance, to break open Doors, Chests, Trunks and other Package, there to seize, and from thence to bring, any Kind of Goods or Merchandize [sic] whatsoever, prohibited and uncustomed." Act of Frauds [section] 5(2) (1662), reprinted in SMITH, supra note 41, at 25 (emphasis omitted).