undanceable

undanceable

(ʌnˈdɑːnsəbəl)
adj
not able to be danced or danced to
References in periodicals archive ?
Rock became undanceable noise with the rise of Swans and Sonic Youth; purist strands of club culture emerged; hip-hop increasingly defined itself as its own movement and extended nationwide.
(41) If 'Intelligent Dance Music' made a virtue out of being undanceable, revelling in its status as 'dance music you can't dance to,' here we find precisely the inverse: Music that wants to be danced to, but cannot be.
To begin with, it seemed to us to be undanceable, awkward.
And there are some very beautiful, undanceable songs, too." In the late 1990s, they won an American Lifetime Achievement Award, a Brit Award and were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
Critics and even dancers derided the music, describing it as undanceable, and Tchaikovsky suffered the bitterness of failure.
Much more consistent in quality is the unaccompanied E major Partita, Thomas weaving wonderful feats of harmonic implication beneath seamless melodic lines; odd, though, that no Minuet repeats were observed, and that the Bourree should have been taken at such an undanceable lick.
Or, to put it another way, should political music be "undanceable"?
Instead, the band starts another tune: like "Daahoud," an up-tempo, undanceable, hard-bop number.
But I'd like to think that they signify something else: a new gay civility, perhaps, or--better--a sign that as we tire of falling into K-holes or coke-and-crystal stupors every weekend and of gyrating to numbingly undanceable music, we seek other ways of spending a night out.
Who else would have taken a doofy rock "classic" like "Do You Wanna Dance" and sped it up to undanceable speeds?