undepraved

undepraved

(ˌʌndɪˈpreɪvd)
adj
not corrupted
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References in periodicals archive ?
The man must be a prodigy who can retain his manners and morals undepraved by such circumstances.
Tucker quoted Jefferson's famous assertion that "[t]he man must be a prodigy who can retain his manners and morals undepraved by [the] circumstances [of being a slaveowner]." Id.
One of the first reviews of The Brides' Tragedy, by the dramatist and critic George Darley in the London Magazine, praised Beddoes to the skies for his 'undepraved ear, and his native energy of mind', and for possessing 'tragic powers of the very highest order', but then brought him down to earth with a criticism as shrewd as it was prescient: The energy, passion, terribility, and sublime eloquence of the stage, he appears perfectly competent to: his faculties in the artful development of story, the contrastment and individualizationof characters, the composition of effective dialogue, the management of incidents, scenes, and situations, &c.
As Jefferson himself told us, "the man must be a prodigy who can retain his manners and morals undepraved" within such a system.
The seventh, however, occurring in a letter to Bailey on 3 November 1817, is a nominalization of the adjective: "O for a recourse somewhat human independant of the great Consolations of Religion and undepraved Sensations.
In "Query XVIII" of the Notes Jefferson argues, despite his own slaveholding, that "The whole commerce between master and slave is a perpetual exercise of the most boisterous passions, the most unremitting despotism on the one part, and degrading submissions on the other" and concludes that "The man must be a prodigy who can retain his manners and morals undepraved by such circumstances" (288).
The seventh, however, occurring in a letter to Bailey on 3 November 1817, is a nominalization of the adjective: "O for a recourse somewhat human independent of the great Consolations of Religion and undepraved Sensations.