underfoot

un·der·foot

 (ŭn′dər-fo͝ot′)
adv.
1. Below or under the foot or feet; against the ground: trampled the plants underfoot.
2. At or under the foot or feet; on the ground: moist, cool, soft grass growing underfoot.
3. Hindering progress; in the way: pets, toys, and children underfoot.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

underfoot

(ˌʌndəˈfʊt)
adv
1. underneath the feet; on the ground
2. in a position of subjugation or subservience
3. in the way
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

un•der•foot

(ˌʌn dərˈfʊt)

adv.
1. under the foot or feet; on the ground or underneath.
2. in the way.
adj.
3. lying under the foot or feet; in a position to be stepped on.
[1150–1200]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.underfoot - under the feetunderfoot - under the feet; "trampled the beans underfoot"; "green grass growing underfoot"
2.underfoot - in the way and hindering progress; "a house with children and pets and toys always underfoot"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
تَحْت القَدَمَيْن
na zemi
undir fæti
po kojomis
apakšāzem kājām
na zemi
ayak altında

underfoot

[ˈʌndəˈfʊt] ADVdebajo de los pies
it's wet underfootel suelo está mojado
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

underfoot

[ˌʌndərˈfʊt] advsous les pieds
to trample sth underfoot → piétiner qch
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

underfoot

[ˌʌndəˈfʊt] advsotto i piedi, per terra
to trample underfoot (also) (fig) → calpestare
the children are always getting underfoot → i bambini sono sempre tra i piedi
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

underfoot

(andəˈfut) adjective
on the ground under the feet of anyone walking. It is not actually raining just now but it is very wet underfoot.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
As soon as thou art awake dig up the ground underfoot, and thou shalt find a bow of brass and three arrows of lead.
Don Quixote laughed, and asked them to take off the next cloth, underneath which was seen the image of the patron saint of the Spains seated on horseback, his sword stained with blood, trampling on Moors and treading heads underfoot; and on seeing it Don Quixote exclaimed, "Ay, this is a knight, and of the squadrons of Christ!
All that time he heard nothing but the sound of a million little waters, overhead from the trees, and underfoot along the ground, soaking through the pine-needles, dripping from the tongues of draggled fern, and spouting in newly-torn muddy channels down the slopes.
Rouncewell's townsman heard of the disclosure, he no more allowed the girl to be patronized and honoured than he would have suffered her to be trodden underfoot before his eyes.
My garden is surrounded by cornfields and meadows, and beyond are great stretches of sandy heath and pine forests, and where the forests leave off the bare heath begins again; but the forests are beautiful in their lofty, pink-stemmed vastness, far overhead the crowns of softest gray-green, and underfoot a bright green wortleberry carpet, and everywhere the breathless silence; and the bare heaths are beautiful too, for one can see across them into eternity almost, and to go out on to them with one's face towards the setting sun is like going into the very presence of God.
They kicked heel-holds in the soft earth, rubbed their hands with the soil from underfoot, and laughed and joked with the crowd that surged about them.
They who know what it is to have a reprieve brought to them upon the ladder, or to be rescued from thieves just going to murder them, or who have been in such extremities, may guess what my present surprise of joy was, and how gladly I put my boat into the stream of this eddy; and the wind also freshening, how gladly I spread my sail to it, running cheerfully before the wind, and with a strong tide or eddy underfoot.
Thus talking hand in hand alone they pass'd On to thir blissful Bower; it was a place Chos'n by the sovran Planter, when he fram'd All things to mans delightful use; the roofe Of thickest covert was inwoven shade Laurel and Mirtle, and what higher grew Of firm and fragrant leaf; on either side ACANTHUS, and each odorous bushie shrub Fenc'd up the verdant wall; each beauteous flour, IRIS all hues, Roses, and Gessamin Rear'd high thir flourisht heads between, and wrought Mosaic; underfoot the Violet, Crocus, and Hyacinth with rich inlay Broiderd the ground, more colour'd then with stone Of costliest Emblem: other Creature here Beast, Bird, Insect, or Worm durst enter none; Such was thir awe of man.
Is the family of Toomai of the Elephants to be trodden underfoot in the dirt of a Keddah?
The wall, by the touch, was of fine hewn stone; the steps too, though somewhat steep and narrow, were of polished masonwork, and regular and solid underfoot. Minding my uncle's word about the bannisters, I kept close to the tower side, and felt my way in the pitch darkness with a beating heart.
Miranda went so far as to say that she wouldn't mind if the Burches came every once in a while, but she was afraid he'd spread abroad the fact of his visit, and missionaries' families would be underfoot the whole continual time.
She went stealthily as a cat through this profusion of growth, gathering cuckoo-spittle on her skirts, cracking snails that were underfoot, staining her hands with thistle-milk and slug-slime, and rubbing off upon her naked arms sticky blights which, though snow-white on the apple-tree trunks, made madder stains on her skin; thus she drew quite near to Clare, still unobserved of him.