underhandedness


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial.

un·der·hand·ed

 (ŭn′dər-hăn′dĭd)
adj.
1. Acting or done in a deceptive, secret, or sly manner; dishonest and sneaky. See Synonyms at secret.
2. Underhand: an underhanded toss.
adv.
1. In a sly and secret way.
2. With an underhand movement.

un′der·hand′ed·ly adv.
un′der·hand′ed·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

underhandedness

noun
References in classic literature ?
"It's the craftiness and underhandedness of your actions that's the worst," said Miranda coldly.
A personality of smallness and egotism and petty underhandedness seemed to emanate from the letters themselves.
Jamieson (1992), however, argues that negativity connotes underhandedness and deceptive messages.
His self-conscious half-smirk as well as the underhandedness of his twisted, backhanded pose may give him away, however.
Iran did not complain about the rejections or accuse the United States of underhandedness. Ali Moradi, chairman of the Iranian Weightlifting Federation, told Sputnik news he didn't see any political provocation.
(61) Clients often found the underhandedness of these kickbacks so infuriating that many relished the opportunity to sue their tax professionals.
'The speed and stealth by which the Marcos burial was carried out by the immediate members of the Marcos family shows their incorrigible addiction to deception, underhandedness and abuse, which the Supreme Court must never condone.
The whole European entanglement started with deceit and has continued with corruption, bullying and underhandedness. Up until now the Commission has had to reckon that if they go too far we might walk out on them but if they win the vote they will be let loose and will make sure we are in no doubt who are the masters.
"Then there was an underhandedness, there were sly remarks.
The foreign policy chief for Presidents Nixon and Ford has been portrayed in dozens of books and by countless witnesses as a coddler of dictators, a cynical practitioner of realpolitik, a war monger, a suck-up to superiors, and a tyrant to subordinates--his genius and wit matched only by his underhandedness. Hitchens's The Trial of Henry Kissinger is the most entertaining such book, but unbecoming portraits also appear in prominent works by Seymour Hersh, Robert Dallek, Margaret MacMillan, and, most recently, Greg Grandin, whose Kissinger's Shadow just arrived in August.
"It's panic at the parliament," ironized on Tuesday the French Ecologist MEP Yannick Jadot for whom the initiative of Martin Schulz comes from "political underhandedness" and is motivated by the fact that the EP President can no longer "guarantee to [President of the European Commission Jean-Claude] Juncker and to [German Chancellor] Angela Merkel a favorable vote" on TTIP from the Parliament.
In turn there was a move into a revival of more serious investigations of rigging and other forms of underhandedness. Along the first lines, South African journalist Ranjeni Munusamy (2013) wrote that Morgan Tsvangirai