underkill

un·der·kill

 (ŭn′dər-kĭl′)
n.
1. Insufficient force to defeat an enemy.
2. An insufficient amount of what is necessary or appropriate for a purpose: regulatory underkill.

un′der·kill′ v.

underkill

(ˈʌndəˌkɪl)
n
(Military) informal US a lesser force than is needed to defeat an enemy
References in periodicals archive ?
"The Underkill" is available to stream (https://open.spotify.com/album/3xtLAvsx3OelJ51LoNCROL?si=Xse_H5K3Q6ix_tVMZ3NI3g) here.
[within] the American system of environmental federalism reduce the risk of regulatory underkill that can result from failures to address environmental ills, as well as failures adequately to fund, implement and enforce written laws and regulations"); Alexandra B.
But they and the rest of us know that nowadays it is not that simple," says the 169-page report: "Underkill: Scalable Capabilities for Military Operations Amid Populations."
(98.) See Arthur Levitt, Jr., Regulatory Underkill, WALL ST.
Compared to some killer-output amps, the clean 80 wpc available from the DSP-A3090 should seem like "underkill." However, high power needs are often overstated, and in this particular room, particularly with a powered subwoofer handling the low bass, this kind of power is more than enough for any requirements.
Accordingly, something as simple as an unadorned hamburger patty seems almost quaint these days, like underkill, which indeed it is.
He knows calculated underkill is the way to make Coward work, and even when the character rants and raves, Bedford holds something in witty reserve.
Since many end up in prison, their fearlessness represents informational underkill. One can avoid danger by being aware of it without being fearful of it; by careful planning and preparation as a matter of task competence.
FOR PROGRESSIVE REGULATION, REGULATORY UNDERKILL: THE BUSH ADMINISTRATION'S INSIDIOUS DISMANTLING OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTIONS 1 (2004) [hereinafter BUZBEE ET AL., REGULATORY UNDERKILL] (noting that "regulated corporations have made determined and concerted efforts to use their wealth and political power to diminish or even eliminate various health, environment, and safety protections"); DRIESEN, IS COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS NEUTRAL?, supra note 91, at 4 (stating that cost-benefit analysis "enjoys strong support from regulated industry and the think tanks it funds"); DAVID M.