underload

underload

(ˈʌndəˌləʊd)
n
the condition of being loaded incompletely
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"It's quite common in people with a history of back pain to underload their back structures and that can lead to pain, but obviously we can go too heavy too.
These factors encompass the mental loads, which might be divided into mental overload and mental underload. The former concerns long-lasting tense situations, and the latter inability to develop mental ability, lack of control over work, distance between supervisors and subordinates, social isolation at the workplace, role conflict, interpersonal conflict and lack of social support (16-18).
This may likely underload +100 kg athletes during testing.
"So in the end I would say it is a good point because we played for 30 minutes with an underload.
However, once these vibration isolator parameters are determined, it cannot be changed and high-static-low-dynamic mechanical properties will change under overload or underload condition, so Daolin Xu et al.
Stanton, "Malleable attentional resources theory: A new explanation for the effects of mental underload on performance," Human Factors: The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, vol.
The objective is to minimize the total costs, including the value of overload and underload items, shipping cost, and truck cost.
De Waard and Brookhuis [4] argued that both overload and underload could impair attention.
Excess workload can result in slower task performance and errors and it should also be noted that underload can also lead to boredom, loss of situation awareness and reduced alertness.
Tatum (2008) for example has described predominantly African-American students in some inner-city US schools as experiencing an 'in-school literacy underload'.
(3) Bryan Alexander et al., "Report from the Information Overload and Underload Workgroup," Open Scholarship Initiative Proceedings; Vol 1 (2016)DO - 10.13021/G8R30G, April 19, 2016, http://journals.gmu.edu/osi/article/view/1383.