underprop

un·der·prop

 (ŭn′dər-prŏp′)
tr.v. un·der·propped, un·der·prop·ping, un·der·props
To prop (something) from below.

underprop

(ˌʌndəˈprɒp)
vb, -props, -propping or -propped
(Building) (tr) to prop up from beneath
ˈunderˌpropper n

un•der•prop

(ˌʌn dərˈprɒp)

v.t. -propped, -prop•ping.
to prop underneath; support; uphold.
[1505–15]
un′der•prop`per, n.

underprop


Past participle: underpropped
Gerund: underpropping

Imperative
underprop
underprop
Present
I underprop
you underprop
he/she/it underprops
we underprop
you underprop
they underprop
Preterite
I underpropped
you underpropped
he/she/it underpropped
we underpropped
you underpropped
they underpropped
Present Continuous
I am underpropping
you are underpropping
he/she/it is underpropping
we are underpropping
you are underpropping
they are underpropping
Present Perfect
I have underpropped
you have underpropped
he/she/it has underpropped
we have underpropped
you have underpropped
they have underpropped
Past Continuous
I was underpropping
you were underpropping
he/she/it was underpropping
we were underpropping
you were underpropping
they were underpropping
Past Perfect
I had underpropped
you had underpropped
he/she/it had underpropped
we had underpropped
you had underpropped
they had underpropped
Future
I will underprop
you will underprop
he/she/it will underprop
we will underprop
you will underprop
they will underprop
Future Perfect
I will have underpropped
you will have underpropped
he/she/it will have underpropped
we will have underpropped
you will have underpropped
they will have underpropped
Future Continuous
I will be underpropping
you will be underpropping
he/she/it will be underpropping
we will be underpropping
you will be underpropping
they will be underpropping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been underpropping
you have been underpropping
he/she/it has been underpropping
we have been underpropping
you have been underpropping
they have been underpropping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been underpropping
you will have been underpropping
he/she/it will have been underpropping
we will have been underpropping
you will have been underpropping
they will have been underpropping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been underpropping
you had been underpropping
he/she/it had been underpropping
we had been underpropping
you had been underpropping
they had been underpropping
Conditional
I would underprop
you would underprop
he/she/it would underprop
we would underprop
you would underprop
they would underprop
Past Conditional
I would have underpropped
you would have underpropped
he/she/it would have underpropped
we would have underpropped
you would have underpropped
they would have underpropped
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
But now, my Faustus, that thou mayst perceive What Rome contains for to delight thine eyes, Know that this city stands upon seven hills That underprop the groundwork of the same: Just through the midst runs flowing Tiber's stream, With winding banks that cut it in two parts; Over the which two stately bridges lean, That make safe passage to each part of Rome: Upon the bridge call'd Ponte Angelo Erected is a castle passing strong, Where thou shalt see such store of ordnance, As that the double cannons, forg'd of brass, Do match the number of the days contain'd Within the compass of one complete year; Beside the gates, and high pyramides, That Julius Caesar brought from Africa.
York thus wanted to stage a careful representation of the city as a necessary underprop to Henry's successful rule (which it undoubtedly was) while it needed to maintain a clear supporting role in a dramatic narrative of providentialism and divine right.
(L4r) Like the defiant Jane, Drayton's Guilford expresses resistance through an architectural metaphor, comparing Jane's and his fall to that of a building: "And those which should our greatnes underprop, / Raze our foundation, overthrow our top" (L4r).
What penny hath Rome borne, What men provided, what munition sent, To underprop this action?
the universe is orderly and providential after all." (14) In an analysis of 2 Henry IV, David Kastan similarly remarks that "sovereignty would construct itself upon a vertical axis of authorization, a synchronic principle of divine authority," and therefore much of King Henry and Prince Hal's preoccupation with performance and publicity constitutes an attempt to legitimate themselves by hiding the "horizontal, diachronic axis of coercive power" that underprops their claim to the throne.
The fact that Galton does not deny the humanity of a people he wished to colonize and abuse essentially underprops the logical economy of nineteenth-century imperialism and its supporting racist ideology.