underreaction

un·der·re·act

 (ŭn′dər-rē-ăkt′)
intr.v. un·der·re·act·ed, un·der·re·act·ing, un·der·re·acts
To react with insufficient enthusiasm, force, or emphasis.

un′der·re·ac′tion n.

underreaction

(ˌʌndərɪˈækʃən)
n
a less intense reaction than is expected or appropriate
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, I'd argue they were unequivocally justified in their actions and that it was - if anything - an underreaction to the problems we face.
Short-term overreaction, underreaction and efficient reaction: evidence from the London Stock Exchange.
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN REACTIVITY AND ORGANIZATIONAL RISK IN LOW AND HIGH EO LEADERS WITH ZONES OF OVERREACTION AND UNDERREACTION.
Teoh, 2009, "Driven to Distraction: Extraneous Events and Underreaction to Earnings News," Journal of Finance 64, 2289-2325.
We extend the literature on investor inattention by introducing a new type of investor distraction, which we call conflicting-mood investor distraction, and by examining whether it can cause underreaction to earnings news that conflicts with investors' mood states.
"Investor Reaction to Corporate Event Announcements: Underreaction or Overreaction?" Journal of Business, vol.
However, PANI gave an underreaction against the acetone gas, while a clear recovery process was not observed.
Similarly, the largest contributing factor for momentum profits is the underreaction effect, whereas cross-sectional risk is the second largest factor that positively affects momentum profits.
So there is a neglect of the "tail" bad state initially and excessive credit extension, an initial underreaction to bad news, and eventually, overreaction.
When, and to what extent, do we tend to commit the general errors of overreaction and underreaction to new information?
Market underreaction to open market share repurchases.