understorey

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understorey

or

understory

n, pl -reys or -ries
(Forestry) a lower tier of shrubs and small trees under the main canopy of forest trees
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

understorey

[ˈʌndəˌstɔːrɪ] Nmonte m bajo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Floristic patterns in understoreys under different disturbance severities in seasonal forests.
Interactions between acclimation and photoinhibition of photosynthesis of a tropical forest understorey herb, Alocasia macrorrhiza, during simulated canopy gap formation.
The possums construct their dreys in these dense shrubby understoreys and can avoid travel across the ground between food trees where they are vulnerable to ground predators.
In addition to bushland remnants, street and garden trees in Mount Eliza with dense understoreys are also severely affected by ringtail possum overbrowsing (Carr et al.
xxii), this book is firmly focused on trees and the extent and spatial patterns of forest clearing; there is little ecology and virtually nothing of birds and bees (or beasts and understoreys) here.
Bennett A and Coulson G (2008) Evaluation of an exclusion plot design for determining the impacts of native and exotic herbivores on forest understoreys. Australian Mammalogy 30, 83-87.
For this reason, although scattered mature trees and sometimes even tree copses are frequently found, the understorey has often been reduced to a minimal expression by cattle-farming (goats, cows and horses) activities.
The combination of a coniferous tree, with a higher cover rate, and a deciduous species, such as Nothofagus obliqua, gives rise to a myriad of understorey microhabitats with extraordinarily changing light conditions (Figure 4) and very different contributions of dead leaves.
Four categories of algal types were analyzed based on height and growth patterns: (1) canopy; (2) understorey (large bottom cover); (3) turf (short bottom cover); and (4) encrusting.
Canopy-forming kelp, namely Macrocystis integrifolia and Nereocystis luetkeana, and two genera of understorey kelp, Pterygophora californica and Laminaria spp., were used to define these communities.