undertow

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un·der·tow

 (ŭn′dər-tō′)
n.
1. An underwater current flowing strongly away from shore, usually caused by the seaward return of water from waves that have broken against the shore.
2. A tendency, especially in thought or feeling, contrary to what seems the strongest: "As she talks nostalgically of her days of glory ... a poignant undertow emerges" (Tina Brown).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

undertow

(ˈʌndəˌtəʊ)
n
1. (Physical Geography) the seaward undercurrent following the breaking of a wave on the beach
2. (Physical Geography) any strong undercurrent flowing in a different direction from the surface current
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

un•der•tow

(ˈʌn dərˌtoʊ)

n.
1. the seaward, subsurface flow of water from waves breaking on a beach.
2. any strong subsurface current, moving in a direction different from that of the surface current.
[1810–20]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

un·der·tow

(ŭn′dər-tō′)
An underwater current flowing strongly away from shore. Undertows are generally caused by the seaward return of water from waves that have broken against the shore.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.undertow - an inclination contrary to the strongest or prevailing feelingundertow - an inclination contrary to the strongest or prevailing feeling; "his account had a poignant undertow of regret"
inclination - that toward which you are inclined to feel a liking; "her inclination is for classical music"
2.undertow - the seaward undercurrent created after waves have broken on the shoreundertow - the seaward undercurrent created after waves have broken on the shore
undertide, undercurrent - a current below the surface of a fluid
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

undertow

[ˈʌndətəʊ] Nresaca f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

undertow

[ˈʌndəˌtəʊ] n (of wave) → corrente f di risacca; (undercurrent) → risucchio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Outwardly, to the knowledge of the Claytons, all went on as before upon the little vessel; but that there was an undertow leading them toward some unknown danger both felt, though they did not speak of it to each other.
The surf was not heavy, and there was no undertow, so we made shore easily, effecting an equally easy landing.
"Winds and undertows can cause serious problems even for professional swimmers.
that might've wrangled us by our ankles into undertows. A Petosky
"There's a lack of education regarding riptides and undertows and many UK tourists are totally unaware of the dangers lurking, even at the edge of the water."