undeservedness

undeservedness

(ˌʌndɪˈzɜːvɪdnɪs)
n
the quality or state of being undeserved
References in periodicals archive ?
That's a big problem in our society--we have feelings of inferiority, and these feelings of inferiority are often translated into feelings of undeservedness. The word deserve comes from two Latin words meaning/rom service.
If he is to triumph over California Chrome (right) - not to mention the likes of Frosted, a horse more than capable of running a huge race - there will be no question of undeservedness.
But consider the alternative: If morally constructed deservedness in the context of fair opportunity is not important, do we admit allegiance to undeservedness? If so, what does this mean for morality, ethics, and liberty's enduring prospect?
If undeservedness is the system's guiding star, then any geopolitical risk that can be contemplated is a risk that could arise.
The undeservedness of Indigenous people for the land was attributed to their positioning as "hunters" without rights in land.
Unable to sustain itself within itself, and perhaps tormented by feelings of its own undeservedness, guilt, or sin, it comes to know melancholy and despondent moments of loneliness, frustration, or despair.
He detailed the all-sufficiency of Christ, the power of his death and resurrection to atone for human sin, despite the absolute undeservedness of such salvation.
Even so, if punished, we would suffer a sense of its undeservedness. Someone who doubts this might consider the opposite possibility--doing some act deserving of great praise or public recognition.
undeservedness on the part of the Lamb that makes the sacrifice
By relocating undeservedness in the paltriness of criticism - Festinger's 'is not sufficient' - rather than in the strength of punishment, internal harmony between felt nobility of purpose and the vehicle (EMU) of that purpose may be re-established.
This dichotomy introduces, it is true, a dimension which requires the preservation of some kind of distinction, though not an opposition, between the two, namely the dimension of grace, mercy, or undeservedness. In most cases, however, a right and a privilege are the same thing.