undialectical

undialectical

(ˌʌndaɪəˈlɛktɪkəl)
adj
not dialectical; not resolving views; dogmatic
References in periodicals archive ?
The French philosopher, Michel Foucault, stated that "space was treated as the dead, the fixed, the undialectical, the immobile.
You feel the author on every page, his pain at the condition of the world, his compassion for the suffering of the world, and something at least of his frustration with those who define faith by doctrine and those who reject doctrine in favor of spiritual "feelings." Perhaps the argument could be enlarged by facing its undialectical character.
While Lukacs is certainly correct to highlight the problems of Schopenhauer's metaphysics, his reading is, at the same time, troublingly undialectical. Schopenhauer is, to be sure, misguided in his attempt to subsume everything that exists under a single timeless category, the will; additionally, his aesthetics and asceticism, proposed as ways of countering egotism, reveal themselves, paradoxically, to be nothing more than a celebration of "the individual's pure self-sufficiency" (Lukacs 2016, 208).
A complex, dreadful piece of history becomes an undialectical ordeal of viciousness and victimhood.

These two exhibitions suggested a growing consensus about art being a transformative discipline, and the undialectical negation of autonomy it is often presumed to entail.
While BiDil might be said to ontologize blackness as a corporeal truth for market accumulation, the neoliberal logics and spatial technologies of medical hot spotting work to ontologize racialized spaces--they ontologize structural racism as space, as transparent/self-evident, race-neutral, dehistoricized, undialectical space.
Barthes stares in morbid certainty at the photo of his mother, a violent image, brute and undialectical, that 'fills the sight by force' and slashes at him with 'lacerating emphasis': her death will have already been encoded in the photograph.
(12) Edward Said noticed this omission ("the injunction laid on the Jews by God to exterminate their opponents") in a critical review of Michael Walzer's much-read book Exodus and Revolution, which he indicts as "so undialectical, so simplifying, so ahistorical and reductive." The exalting view of the Exodus biblical as a process of redemption of the Hebrew slaves oftentimes eludes the ethnic cleansing and genocide of the indigenous Canaanites and "minimizes, if it does not completely obliterate, a sense of responsibility for what a people undergoing Redemption does to other less fortunate people, unredeemed, strange, displaced and outside moral concern." (13) This critical perspective might lead to read the Exodus/conquest biblical narratives "with the eyes of the Canaanites".
Foucault questioned why time has traditionally been seen as "richness, fecundity, life, dialectic" while space has been treated as "the dead, the fixed, the undialectical, the immobile" (Foucault 1980, 70), when, as Einstein had demonstrated, the two are inextricably bound together.
Moreover, Adorno is certainly aware that denying Heidegger is to commit the same mistake that he accuses Heidegger of making--i.e., Heidegger's aims of "ahistorical truth" and "an essentially undialectical philosophy" ("The Actuality of Philosophy" 35).
253, Perhaps unlike Althusser and Foucault, then, Adorno is far more difficult to situate within the rigid, undialectical polarity of humanism versus anti-humanism, For more on this discussion of humanism within the tradition of Althusserian Marxism and its relation to post-structuralism, see Simon Choat, Marx through Post-Structuralism: Lyotard, Derrida, Foucault, Deleuze (New York, Continuum: 2012).
He faults not only the undialectical way of thinking that lies behind Yoder's claim of a "faithful church" but also asserts that his claim is accompanied by an arrogant spirit and a confusion of categories.