undisciplinable

undisciplinable

(ʌnˈdɪsɪˌplɪnəbəl)
adj
unable to be disciplined or controlled
References in periodicals archive ?
She has an insecure majority, an undisciplinable cabinet and an alienated opposition.
The criminals portrayed on Cops are not figures who participate in the rational calculus inspired by the threat of surveillance and the specter of punishment: They come to represent the resurgence of the category of the undisciplinable. The very staging of the show emphasizes the obliviousness of the alleged criminals it portrays to the power of the monitoring gaze.
He argues that 'the development of the productive forces has meant an increase in the exploitation and oppression of certain bodies, those rendered unintelligible, deviant, unproductive, or undisciplinable. There is still a drive by capital, for example, to super-exploit the labor of nationally-oppressed peoples' (Ford, this issue).
The court is made up of "compact disciplines;" the hinterlands are ruled by the "diffuse disciplines;" the colonies, by "would be disciplines;" and political and ethical argument are found only in the wilds of the "undisciplinable." The advance of reason is equated with single-mindedness of purpose.
Smiths personal style was described by the political journalistAndrew Rothas that of an undisciplinable but formidable Poujadist,.
"She was undisciplinable," recalls music writer Jon Savage, who was Margi's researcher for the show.
On the contrary, the development of the productive forces has meant an increase in the exploitation and oppression of certain bodies, those rendered unintelligible, deviant, unproductive, or undisciplinable. There is still a drive by capital, for example, to super-exploit the labor of nationally-oppressed peoples.