undiscriminating

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Related to undiscriminatingly: discriminatingly

un·dis·crim·i·nat·ing

 (ŭn′dĭ-skrĭm′ə-nā′tĭng)
adj.
1. Lacking sensitivity, taste, or judgment.
2. Indiscriminate.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

undiscriminating

(ˌʌndɪsˈkrɪmɪˌneɪtɪŋ)
adj
lacking discernment in matters of taste
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.undiscriminating - not discriminating
indiscriminate - not marked by fine distinctions; "indiscriminate reading habits"; "an indiscriminate mixture of colors and styles"
discriminating - showing or indicating careful judgment and discernment especially in matters of taste; "the discriminating eye of the connoisseur"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

undiscriminating

[ˈʌndɪsˈkrɪmɪneɪtɪŋ] ADJsin discernimiento
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

undiscriminating

[ˌʌndɪsˈkrɪmɪˌneɪtɪŋ] adj (choice) → indiscriminato/a; (person) → che non fa discriminazioni; (taste) → non selettivo/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The measure must be proportional to the situation that has determined it, to be applied undiscriminatingly and without bringing any prejudice to the existence of law or liberty".
So when Gowan undiscriminatingly applies the same familiarities (the affectionate, non-meaning use of "old," the bonhomie of "fellow") to corrupt individuals--"I am happy to tell you I find the most worthless of men to be the dearest old fellow too"--Dickens has espoused the Ciceronian ideal of friendship to expose what he would conceive as being a reductive Rochefoucaultian (and Thackeravian) travesty, driving the point home when Gowan embraces Rigaud, the double-dyed villain of the plot, as a friend of sorts.
that " A phrase begins life as a literary expression; its felicity leads to its lazy repetition; and repetition soon establishes it as a legal formula, undiscriminatingly used to express different and sometimes contradictory ideas." Returning to the case at hand, the AIIMS faculty case, I fear that it will now be argued as a matter of binding law in all constitutional courts of the country that " the very concept of reservation implies mediocrity".