undivine

undivine

(ˌʌndɪˈvaɪn)
adj
not divine
References in periodicals archive ?
These include the sweeping costume drama Irydion, in which the author sets forth the grievances of his occupied nation through the fable of an uprising of Greeks and barbarians against the dissipated emperor Heliogabalus, and, of course, the monumental drama on which his international fame rests: the Undivine Comedy.
She stated, "it is precisely in the ideology of the form that we can perceive the means through which Dante controls his readers and shapes their readings" (Undivine Comedy 17.) Barolini sought to reveal Dante's strategies and uncover the traces of his intentional (and albeit fictionalizing) non-fictionalizing of his biblical landscapes.
By comparison, Barolini in The Undivine Comedy: Detheologizing Dante indicts "overdetermined theologized hermeneutic structures" for their ahistorical consequences, a view summed up in her contention elsewhere that "One of the results of detheologizing ...
Bulac's Contemporary Concepts and Orders broke with Marxism, capitalism and secularism to produce a symbolic Islamic alternative by talking about "an Islamist approach against the contemporary world and its orders." According to him, fascism, capitalism and communism were collectively Western and undivine orders.
If Krasinski were German and Prus French, The Undivine Comedy and The Doll would have been included in each European canon a long time ago.
It is precisely in the texts and symbols considered canonic for Polish identity, in the writings of Staszic, Mickiewicz, and Krasinski, in the legends of national liberation and the heroic myth of dying for the country, that Janion deciphers and unearths records and traces of half-explored themes--Jewish or simply antisemitic, as in Krasinskis The Undivine Comedy.
e per le note di questa comedia, lettor, ti giuro, s'elle non sien di lunga grazia vote, ch'i' vidi per quell'aere grosso e scuro venir notando una figura in suso, maravigliosa ad ogne cor sicuro (And by the notes of this my Comedy, reader, I swear-- and may my verse find favor for long years-- that through the dense and darkened air I saw a figure swimming, rising up, enough to bring amazement to the firmest heart) This "Geryon principle," as I call it in The Undivine Comedy, whereby Dante routinely opts for bold frontal attacks on the reader's credulity in precisely the moments in which the fictitious nature of his project is most exposed, is succinctly and elegantly formulated by Riffaterre as a property of all narrative.
(Fourteen of the pieces are reprinted with, at most, occasional bibliographical updating in the footnotes; the last two are more significantly revised, and include important new work that shows Barolini developing her longstanding interest in gender.) Turning these pages, the reader encounters, one after another, articles that changed the contours of North American scholarly thinking about Dante, Petrarch, and Boccaccio in the 1980s and 1990s, the period when Barolini was also producing two major books, Dante's Poets: Textuality and Truth in the "Comedy" (1984) and The Undivine "Comedy": Detheologizing Dante (1992): all of them still as fresh, as challenging, and as worthy of attention as the day they were published.
Femaleness then becomes the undivine other, the leftover, the unknown, the unholy, the addenda.
Pearl's top ten books for Dante lovers are, from one to ten, The First Circle by Alexander Solzhenitsyn; Hannibal by Thomas Harris; The Wasteland and Other Poems by TS Eliot; If This is a Man by Primo Levi; The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco; The Undivine Comedy by Teodolinda Barolini; Dante's Testaments by Peter Hawkins; The Poets' Dante, edited by Peter Hawkins and Rachel Jacoff; Frankenstein by Mary Shelley; The Vision of Dante Alighieri by Henry Francis Cary.
It is not clear that Dante makes a "jump into silence" in paragraph 23 when his way is cut off, but as Barolini has argued, he makes a `jump' into a different, a lyrical, mode ("The Undivine Comedy," chapter 10).
Teodolinda Barolini, in an essay derived from her Undivine Comedy (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1992), after first usefully summarizing the taxonomy of the debate on the significance of Ulysses, argues his importance for the transgressive 'lyric' side of the poem, rather than for the more regular, narrative one.