undogmatic


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Related to undogmatic: stolid, libidinous, mawkish

undogmatic

(ˌʌndɒɡˈmætɪk)
adj
not dogmatic; freethinking; not accepting of (esp religious) authority
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.undogmatic - unwilling to accept authority or dogma (especially in religion)
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
broad-minded - inclined to respect views and beliefs that differ from your own; "a judge who is broad-minded but even-handed"
References in classic literature ?
The feeling was very subtle and quite undogmatic, and he never imparted it to any other of the characters in this entanglement.
Sapolsky ends the chapter with a display of his pleasingly undogmatic spirit, confessing that he finds it impossible actually to live his life as though he does not have free will.
E Would you agree then to be called an undogmatic economist?
Key, used both interests and opinions to develop his undogmatic insights, in some ways still unsurpassed, in his major work Southern Politics in State and Nation (1949), contrasting Southern politics with the rest of the country.
Ross's temporal and spatial stretching of the Commune as an event, together with her focus on the ideas, attitudes and actions of the Communards and their fellow-travellers, yields a richly variegated and balanced work that is refreshingly undogmatic.
Kagan's undogmatic approach means that she, like Roberts, tries to find opportunities for common ground.
Sometimes Always True: Undogmatic Pluralism in Politics, Metaphysics, and Epistemology
Thinkers like Erasmus of Rotterdam turned Christian traditions into undogmatic humanism, bent on eradicating the denominational borders within Christianity.
the idea that there is a mapping of the states of the external reality onto the states of the cognitive system; (d) it maintains an agnostic relationship with reality; (e) the focus of research is moved from the world that consists of matter to the world that consists of what matters (6); (f) it emphasizes that it is the cognitive system that organizes her experiences, resulting in an "individual as personal scientist" approach; (g) it focuses on self-referential and organizationally closed systems that strive for control over their inputs rather than their outputs; (h) process-oriented explanations are preferred over substance-based ones; and (i) it asks for an open and undogmatic approach to science.
Chapter 5, "The Improvisations of Pierre Cochereau," is similarly technical and undogmatic and provides many examples in transcription.
The example derives only from within a single discipline, Sociology, although it is a reasonable testing ground not only because it is currently comparatively undogmatic as regards theory or doctrine but also because many of its controversies find echoes between and within other social sciences.
43) Creative writing, Thompson rehearsed repeatedly, was not just associated with "the undogmatic perception of social reality," (44) it was also a bulwark against abstraction and mechanical materialism and the most likely reserve of needs and desires--the utopian and moral imagination, value choice, and lived historical experience--crucial to any worthwhile socialist society.