undogmatic


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Related to undogmatic: stolid, libidinous, mawkish

undogmatic

(ˌʌndɒɡˈmætɪk)
adj
not dogmatic; freethinking; not accepting of (esp religious) authority
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.undogmatic - unwilling to accept authority or dogma (especially in religion)
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
broad-minded - inclined to respect views and beliefs that differ from your own; "a judge who is broad-minded but even-handed"
References in classic literature ?
The feeling was very subtle and quite undogmatic, and he never imparted it to any other of the characters in this entanglement.
In his phrasing in this letter he is "cautious and undogmatic, and he specifically calls for discussion and dialogue."
John Addams's undogmatic Protestant religious practice impressed his daughter.
My (undogmatic) intuition here is that Mao was invoking this Hegelian-Marxist-Leninist theoretical armature because it had been employed so fruitfully in the most successful revolution at that point in the twentieth century (the October Revolution of 1917), and that even as he did this, he sought to widen it in profound and original ways when adapting it to China's proto-revolutionary circumstances.
Decisive yet undogmatic in such identifications, Rutter provides an overview of how different critics have interpreted such allusiveness.
Toulmin says that the undogmatic suggestions of "practical
E Would you agree then to be called an undogmatic economist?
Key, used both interests and opinions to develop his undogmatic insights, in some ways still unsurpassed, in his major work Southern Politics in State and Nation (1949), contrasting Southern politics with the rest of the country.
Ross's temporal and spatial stretching of the Commune as an event, together with her focus on the ideas, attitudes and actions of the Communards and their fellow-travellers, yields a richly variegated and balanced work that is refreshingly undogmatic. In the first part of her book, Ross addresses the lived experience and ideas of the Communards while they held Paris.
Rather, the experienced person proves to be, on the contrary, someone who is radically undogmatic; who, because of the many experiences he has had and the knowledge he has drawn from them, is particularly well equipped to have new experiences and to learn from them.