unenterprising


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Related to unenterprising: enterprising

unenterprising

(ʌnˈɛntəˌpraɪzɪŋ)
adj
lacking in boldness and initiative
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unenterprising - lacking in enterprise; not bold or venturesome
unadventurous - lacking in boldness
ambitionless, unambitious - having little desire for success or achievement
enterprising - marked by imagination, initiative, and readiness to undertake new projects; "an enterprising foreign policy"; "an enterprising young man likely to go far"
Translations

unenterprising

[ˈʌnˈentəpraɪzɪŋ] ADJ [person] → poco emprendedor, falto de iniciativa; [character, policy, act] → tímido

unenterprising

adj person, policyohne Unternehmungsgeist, hausbacken (inf); it was very unenterprising of them to turn it downdass sie abgelehnt haben beweist, wie wenig Unternehmungsgeist sie haben

unenterprising

[ʌnˈɛntəˌpraɪzɪŋ] adjpoco intraprendente
References in classic literature ?
This is a very common course of things, even in the present state of the Union; but it was peculiarly the fortunes of the two extremes of society, in the peaceful and unenterprising colonies of Pennsylvania and New Jersey,
In London at the present moment there exist some thousands of respectable, neatly-dressed, mechanical, unenterprising young men, employed at modest salaries by various banks, corporations, stores, shops, and business firms.
He was as respectable, as neatly-dressed, as mechanical, and as unenterprising. His life was bounded, east, west, north, and south, by the Planet Insurance Company, which employed him; and that there were other ways in which a man might fulfil himself than by giving daily imitations behind a counter of a mechanical figure walking in its sleep had never seriously crossed his mind.
If he had the courage to encounter danger, he at least hated the trouble of going to seek it; and while he agreed in the general principles laid down by Cedric concerning the claim of the Saxons to independence, and was still more easily convinced of his own title to reign over them when that independence should be attained, yet when the means of asserting these rights came to be discussed, he was still ``Athelstane the Unready,'' slow, irresolute, procrastinating, and unenterprising. The warm and impassioned exhortations of Cedric had as little effect upon his impassive temper, as red-hot balls alighting in the water, which produce a little sound and smoke, and are instantly extinguished.
This nerves the African, naturally patient, timid and unenterprising, with heroic courage, and leads him to suffer hunger, cold, pain, the perils of the wilderness, and the more dread penalties of recapture.
All can see, or say they see, that Picasso is an inventor and innovator of genius, while most reckon Matisse an attractive decorator, essentially conservative and unenterprising.'
Long characterized as conservative, secretive, and unenterprising in its management of a trade monopoly over a vast area encompassing 1.5 million square miles and including much of present-day western and northern Canada, the HBC is fast becoming a standard case study for the adaptability in long-distance overseas trade during the early modern period.
We have ceased to believe that because of the accidents or misfortunes of birth, the parentless child is condemned to a life of dull, drab, unenterprising and ignorant mediocrity.
A typical passage reads, "Small nostrils are usually an indubitable sign of unenterprising timidity.
Despite this unenterprising performance, Harriers have climbed to second in the table behind Cambridge United and Burr admitted: "We had to buckle down and grind out a result and that's what we did."
So, Tory and LibDem whingers and unenterprising local traders, stop complaining and get business moving!
It all started innocently enough with a series of eight fictitious "Letters from Podunk" published in the Daily National Pilot out of Buffalo, N.Y., and soon reprinted in papers across the country, in which the anonymous columnist painted Podunk as a rustic, backward, unenterprising village, its residents socially starved and intellectually underprivileged.