unfallen

unfallen

(ʌnˈfɔːlən)
adj
not fallen
References in classic literature ?
A most imperial and archangelical apparition of that unfallen, western world, which to the eyes of the old trappers and hunters revived the glories of those primeval times when Adam walked majestic as a god, bluff-bowed and fearless as this mighty steed.
It was strangely frightful to the young man's imagination to see this air of insecurity in a person cultivating a garden, that most simple and innocent of human toils, and which had been alike the joy and labor of the unfallen parents of the race.
The unspoiled memory of angels exhibits qualities similar to those of unfallen human memory.
My view of Marvell's attitude to the "virginity" in the poem, however, is diametrically opposed to Rogers, who claims that T.C.'s virginity establishes the potential efficacy of a passive power of reformation; she needs to do "no more than 'lie in the green Grass' to effect nature's gradual return to its unfallen state" (244).
His claim can best be situated not only within his age's restless attempts to imagine an unfallen human condition, but also within the section in Religio Medici that most directly meditates on Paradise in connection with the virtue of Charity.
In portraying the unfallen world, then, Milton continuously employs the notion of human mastership, grounded in the vision of nature as an orderly hierarchy of ends.
These factors are likely to impact the functioning of a moral sense that was designed to operate in an originally unfallen human community.
As Hahn maintains, "Mary's postpartum virginity"--the very symbol of her unfallen nature--"was regarded as ridiculous" (Hahn 9).
Ironically, even though Nanny is represented as working class and unfallen, she articulates a view that makes a middle-class position necessary to an unfallen state.
Prior to this terrible moment they had existed in an unfallen state of "original righteousness," for they had been created in God's own image, and that image was wholly, utterly good and without stain, spot, flaw, or imperfection.
The Winter's Tale opens with Archidamus' elaborate courtly praise of the entertainment the Bohemians have enjoyed in an apparently idealized Sicilia: Camillo speaks of the perfect harmony between the kings from their childhood and the kings themselves look back to their youth as a time of unfallen innocence, joking about sexual experience as a loss of that innocence (I.
Unfallen Adam learns of Satan's fall and punishment.