unfamiliar


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Related to unfamiliar: unfamiliar territory

un·fa·mil·iar

 (ŭn′fə-mĭl′yər)
adj.
1. Not being acquainted; not conversant: unfamiliar with the roads here.
2. Not within one's knowledge; strange: unfamiliar faces.

un′fa·mil·iar′i·ty (-mĭl-yăr′ĭ-tē, -mĭl′ē-ăr′ĭ-tē) n.
un′fa·mil′iar·ly adv.

unfamiliar

(ˌʌnfəˈmɪljə)
adj
1. not known or experienced; strange
2. (foll by: with) not familiar
unfamiliarity n
ˌunfaˈmiliarly adv

un•fa•mil•iar

(ˌʌn fəˈmɪl yər)

adj.
1. not familiar; not acquainted or conversant with: to be unfamiliar with modern art.
2. unaccustomed; different, unusual, or novel: an unfamiliar treat.
[1585–95]
un`fa•mil`i•ar′i•ty (-iˈær ɪ ti) n.
un`fa•mil′iar•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unfamiliar - not known or well knownunfamiliar - not known or well known; "a name unfamiliar to most"; "be alert at night especially in unfamiliar surroundings"
foreign, strange - relating to or originating in or characteristic of another place or part of the world; "foreign nations"; "a foreign accent"; "on business in a foreign city"
unknown - not known; "an unknown amount"; "an unknown island"; "an unknown writer"; "an unknown source"
familiar - well known or easily recognized; "a familiar figure"; "familiar songs"; "familiar guests"

unfamiliar

adjective
2. (with with) unacquainted with, a stranger to, unaccustomed to, inexperienced in, uninformed about, unversed in, uninitiated in, unskilled at, unpractised in, unconversant with She speaks no Japanese and is unfamiliar with Japanese culture.
unacquainted with experienced in, familiar with, accustomed to, acquainted with, knowledgeable about, conversant with, well-versed in

unfamiliar

adjective
2. Not the same as what was previously known or done:
Translations
غَيْرُ مَأْلُوفغَيْر مألوف، غَريبغَيْر مُطَّلِع على
neznámýneznalý
fremmedubekendt medukendt
vieras
nepoznat
nem ismer
ókunnugur, framandisem òekkir ekki til
不慣れの
익숙지 않은
nenusimanantnesusipažinęsnesusipažinimastarsi nepažindamas
neiepazinisnepazīstamsnezinošssvešs
neznan
obekant
ไม่รู้จักคุ้นเคย
không quen biết

unfamiliar

[ˈʌnfəˈmɪlɪəʳ] ADJdesconocido, extraño
I heard an unfamiliar voiceoí una voz desconocida or extraña
to be unfamiliar with sthno estar familiarizado con algo

unfamiliar

[ˌʌnfəˈmɪliər] adj
(= strange) [place, town, face] → inconnu(e); [person, word] → que l'on ne connaît pas; [aspect] → méconnu(e)
Keep an ongoing list of unfamiliar words → Tenez une liste des mots que vous ne connaissez pas.
to be unfamiliar to sb → être inconnu(e) à qn
to be unfamiliar with sth (= without knowledge of) → mal connaître qch

unfamiliar

adj
(= strange, unknown) experience, taste, sight, surroundingsungewohnt; subject, personfremd, unbekannt; unfamiliar territory (fig)Neuland nt; it is unfamiliar to mees ist ungewohnt für mich, es ist mir fremd or unbekannt
(= unacquainted) to be unfamiliar with somethingetw nicht kennen, mit etw nicht vertraut sein; with machine etcsich mit etw nicht auskennen; I am not unfamiliar with the situationdie Situation ist mir nicht gänzlich unbekannt

unfamiliar

[ˌʌnfəˈmɪljəʳ] adj (subject) → sconosciuto/a; (experience) → insolito/a; (surroundings) → estraneo/a
to be unfamiliar with sth → non essere pratico/a di qc, non avere familiarità con qc

unfamiliar

(anfəˈmiljə) adjective
1. not well-known. He felt nervous about walking along unfamiliar streets.
2. not knowing about. I am unfamiliar with the plays of Shakespeare.
unfaˈmiliarly adverb
unfamiliˈarity noun

unfamiliar

غَيْرُ مَأْلُوف neznámý fremmed unbekannt πρωτόγνωρος poco familiar vieras inhabituel nepoznat sconosciuto 不慣れの 익숙지 않은 onbekend ukjent nieznany desconhecido незнакомый obekant ไม่รู้จักคุ้นเคย aşina olmayan không quen biết 不熟悉的
References in classic literature ?
An indescribable oppression, which seemed to generate in some unfamiliar part of her consciousness, filled her whole being with a vague anguish.
For they are only being driven from promontory to cape; and if one coast is no longer enlivened with their jets, then, be sure, some other and remoter strand has been very recently startled by the unfamiliar spectacle.
Evidently these two young men were unfamiliar with the dueling ceremonies, though they were not unfamiliar with the sword.
No one who is unfamiliar with life in rural neighborhoods can imagine the gravity, the importance, the solemnity of this last day of school.
It was an odd sensation to see his very familiar face established quite at home in that very unfamiliar room and region; and I found myself looking at him, much as I looked at the corner-cupboard with the glass and china, the shells upon the chimney-piece, and the coloured engravings on the wall, representing the death of Captain Cook, a ship-launch, and his Majesty King George the Third in a state-coachman's wig, leather-breeches, and top-boots, on the terrace at Windsor.
All cleverness, whether in the rapid use of that difficult instrument the tongue, or in some other art unfamiliar to villagers, was in itself suspicious: honest folk, born and bred in a visible manner, were mostly not overwise or clever--at least, not beyond such a matter as knowing the signs of the weather; and the process by which rapidity and dexterity of any kind were acquired was so wholly hidden, that they partook of the nature of conjuring.
And in many of the southern and Sicilian provinces the jingle of the telephone bell is still an unfamiliar sound.
While the objects around me--while the carvings of the ceilings, the sombre tapestries of the walls, the ebon blackness of the floors, and the phantasmagoric armorial trophies which rattled as I strode, were but matters to which, or to such as which, I had been accustomed from my infancy--while I hesitated not to acknowledge how familiar was all this--I still wondered to find how unfamiliar were the fancies which ordinary images were stirring up.
He would have liked to slip down beside the little girl and talk with her, though he knew from the words he had overheard that she spoke a language with which he was unfamiliar.
First, because I have been made to learn that the doom and burthen of our life is bound for ever on man's shoulders, and when the attempt is made to cast it off, it but returns upon us with more unfamiliar and more awful pressure.
Coarsely followed, it would have merited a name grown somewhat unfamiliar to our ears.
But people, unfamiliar with such speculations as those of the younger Darwin, forget that the planets must ultimately fall back one by one into the parent body.