unfordable

unfordable

(ʌnˈfɔːdəbəl)
adj
(of a river, flood, stream, etc) not able to be forded
References in classic literature ?
So energetically do we pursue this aim that after crossing an unfordable river we burn the bridges to separate ourselves from our enemy, who at the moment is not Bonaparte but Buxhowden.
Besides this what proved even more depressing for Alexander troops were the disheartening news which they had heard all sorts of alarming rumours that beyond the Beas were deserts unfordable and fierce rivers and powerful nations with tremendous armies.
And the five great (sacred) mountains or Meru, Songgao, Taishan Nanheng, Huashan and Beiheng; the four great famous mountains, Wutai, Putuo Emei and Jiuhua; the four unfordable rivers, Dajiang, Huangho, Huaishui and Jishui; and the five great lakes, Taihu, Poyanghu, Qingcaohu, Danyanghu and Dongtinghu.
The Roman orator Themistius described the bleak outcome from the Roman point of view: "After the indescribable Iliad of evils on the Ister [Dniester] and the onset of the monstrous flame [of war], when there was not yet a king set over the affairs of the Romans, with Thrace laid waste, with Illyria laid waste, when whole armies had vanished completely like a shadow, when neither impassable mountains, unfordable rivers, nor trackless wastes stood in the way, but when finally nearly the whole of the earth and sea had united beside the barbarians.
Rafts are usually the initial means for crossing non-swimming vehicles--particularly tanks--on wide, unfordable rivers.
Among these parallels are the following, i) The name of the leader is Bran in the Welsh story and Brennos in the Greek invasion: Brennos could have become Bran by plausible sound-changes, ii) In both accounts an unfordable river is crossed by Bran/Brennos and his army after the enemy has broken down a bridge, iii) During a climatic battle, Bran/Brennos is mortally wounded by an enemy missile, iv) A treasure used by the Greeks/Irish brings supernatural warriors out against the enemy, v) Bran's/Brennos' warriors return home forlorn.
A dozen trails wind through the area, but only a few lead to the two all-important bridges that span rivers unfordable without them.
In the Lhogyut the larger streams are often fordable and unfordable alternately at different hours of the day, and these hours varying according to the distance from the snow sources.
The absolute volumes of the rivers are generally far inferior to those of the Indian Himalaya, and an unfordable stream is seldom to be looked for, unless in the Lhogyut, or in one of the main trunks of the other zones, and, in summer; but numerical measurements of their actual discharge are still desiderata in both regions, and, in lieu of the former, I can only give a few loose estimates of breadth and depth, taken in crossing fords or bridges, or observed from the banks.
In central Ladak it resumes somewhat of the character it had in Kakzhung, being a good deal spread into wide shallows, with a moderate current: at two points, where most condensed, and unfordable, it is spanned by bridges having waterways of about 100 feet; but at sPituk under Le, it is easily fordable at all seasons, being subdivided into two streams, which in the middle of May I found each about 100 yards wide, and only one and half feet deep, though in summer the depth is greater.
The river of Lungnak becomes unfordable in summer, with a breadth of 30 or 40 yards, immediately below the conflux of its main head-streams in Lingti, only 40 or 50 miles from the furthest sources.
In Lower Ladak the united Indus is generally condensed into a deep surging river, sometimes expanded to a breadth of 100 yards, and sometimes contracted to no more than 10, in the latter cases very rapid, and always of unfordable depth.