ungainsayable

ungainsayable

(ˌʌnɡeɪnˈseɪəbəl)
adj
irrefutable
References in periodicals archive ?
I believe that the core of Hohfeld's analysis is both correct and ungainsayable, especially if exhibited in a simpler and more perspicuous manner.
(27) The Latin is the epigraph for Irving's weighty Life and Voyages, and its chains surely inspired Columbus' own report of his dream in extremity, when stranded and helpless on the shores of Varugua, in the midst of his third voyage, God's own voice addressed the dreamer, who had, like Ulysses, "become a name"--his self-chosen one--while acquiring an ungainsayable fame:
Though his reputation is largely based on his association with the Objectivists (and my own interests lie mostly with his 'Americana" poems and what Robert Creeley calls Rakosi's "ungainsayable plainsong"), it is noteworthy that Rakosi says his favorite of his own works are his "meditative poems," which open his Collected Poems with the title (borrowed from Psalms) "Lord, What Is Man?"
Of course, the story of Histoire du soldat does imply the existence of a superior, ungainsayable authority, namely, the Devil.
The author of a book called Nuestro Sigio (Our Century), my father was a doctor with an avid interest in literature and the arts, and he imparted to me an ungainsayable sense that the movies belong in their company.