ungentrified

ungentrified

(ʌnˈˌdʒɛntrɪˌfaɪd)
adj
(Sociology) not gentrified; not middle class
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Judges said: "The friendly, ungentrified bar at the Irwell Works Brewery could well be our favourite: here is proof that the town's growing appeal hasn't dented its down-to-earth Lancastrian warmth."
One of the last ungentrified neighborhoods in Manhattan, the fragile Chinatown economy has never fully recovered from a succession of economic blows and the 9/11 tragedy.
The arcade boasts one of the few ungentrified communal bathhouses left in the city, alongside stalls offering vegetables, fish, and Japanese sweets.
In fact, I didn't get around to actually reading the book until halfway through my sophomore year, when I was living in a bleak tenement apartment in an as-yet ungentrified area of Brooklyn and wondering what the hell I was doing with my life.
Goldsmith, who has a field day with long-bodied Cadillac coupes and diesel Mercedes, metallic desks and filing cabinets; costume designer Kasia Walicka Mamone, applying bounteous earth tones; and cinematographer Bradford Young, whose widescreen images are retro without ever verging on kitsch, with ungentrified Gotham locations bathed in a crisp winter's light and swirls of indoor cigarette smoke.
Absent from both the current map of stations and near-future expansion plans are kiosks in Harlem, the Bronx, the more ungentrified portions of Brooklyn, most of Queens (to say nothing of "the forgotten borough" of Staten Island).
But while costly makeovers left other cafes soulless, Hawelka's grew in charm with each layer of patina laid down over the more then 70 years of ungentrified existence that left it little changed from the bleak postwar days.
As the crow flies, the neighborhood isn't too far from Manhattan, and lies just east of burgeoning Bushwick, which has attracted many artists due to its low prices for true loft space and the thrill of living on the edge in what is still an ungentrified pocket of Brooklyn.
A white man who had moved to the area within the past few years expressed that gentrification was happening "both economically and racially"; while he opined that "gentrification is certainly not entirely about race," he noted that white people were coming to the neighborhood while black people were leaving: "It's almost that we're moving in opposing directions." One African-American resident, when asked whether his particular neighborhood, still ungentrified and in a state of disinvestment, was changing racially, stated,
"I sell them the property and we have a closing ceremony, but l take back the mortgage note." His mortgages are typically for five years, yet employees' monthly payments are comparable to rents, as the homes tend to be fixer-uppers in ungentrified areas.