ungimmicky

ungimmicky

(ʌnˈɡɪmɪkɪ)
adj
not gimmicky
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike bras with maribou straps and "cheekinis" - net pants with complicated cut-out panels at the back - these are the kinds of ungimmicky ideas that less angelic customers appreciate.
Dizzy from the big-bang onslaught, we look for smaller but more telling and meaningful moments, scenes that are resolutely quiet and ungimmicky, but are full of love and life.
And even farfalle, the ones that are shaped a bit like little butterflies, are, as she puts it, "just a rectangle - squished!" But then she does spoil it a bit by going to a shop in Bologna, where they box up their beautiful little pasta parcels for customers who live miles away, and you think, "Well, if even the Italians can't be bothered to making their own pasta, then why should I?" But Michela is a very restful, ungimmicky cook to watch.
He made us tea in the ungimmicky, square-tabled kitchen and took us to his study with its clear desk, state-of-the-art PC, cartoons of his innumerable guises, and a photo of him sitting with the then Cassius Clay as well as the inevitable shot of him and Henry the bloodhound, which made The Times front cover yesterday.
In any event, these guys rock, and the video production is refreshingly ungimmicky. (If my son is reading this, will he please bring my video back?)
But then there are those who are unflashy, ungimmicky and almost austerely dedicated to consummate-quality music-making with no frills.
10 Peter Hujar (Matthew Marks Gallery, New York) I wanted to note the moment when NBC replaced the astoundingly intelligent, ungimmicky, emotionally disturbing accuracy of Freaks and Geeks with a show called, I think, Lardy Miracles.
These are unfussy, ungimmicky performances, recorded in a fairly resonant acoustic.
Like the readers who wrote to us, our tasters preferred pies that were simple, ungimmicky, filled with fruit, and visually appealing because of the color and texture of the fruit.
And even farfalle, the ones that are shaped a bit like little butterflies, are, as she puts it, "just a rectangle - squished!" But then she spoils it a bit by going to a shop in Bologna, where they box up their beautiful little pasta parcels for customers who live miles away, and you think, "Well, if even the Italians can't be bothered making their own pasta then why should I?" But Michela is a very restful, ungimmicky cook to watch.