ungiving

ungiving

(ʌnˈɡɪvɪŋ)
adj
inflexible; stubborn
References in periodicals archive ?
James said that the future Queen or Queen Consort is relatively ungiving when it comes to body language cues, tells and even leakage during her pregnancies and beyond.
If these same people had been exposed from early youth, in the right way, to great masterpieces of human literature, and learned through them to appreciate the tremendous diversity of human mores and human beliefs that go along with the same degree of sincerity that they possess, plus the complex workings of the inner heart as portrayed by a Tolstoy or a Henry James, they surely could not find it in them to be as harsh, as intolerant, and as ungiving as they are.
Same goes for the interior, with matt wood flashes in some versions adding to the Scandi furniture effect, even if some of the plastics on the dash felt a bit ungiving.
the wall ungiving to any other motive than the painter's,
On issues relating to poverty, the federal government is in a very ungiving place.
INJURIES have blighted a Newcastle back four which has been solid and ungiving during a five-match winning run.
She offers up her pains and joys but is unsocial and ungiving. She engages with her audiences and rejects them.
as seen through the ungiving eyes of youth: nothing.
Silence had a shape, and it was secretive and busy, taking root as you slept, growing while appearing not to grow, year after year, until one morning you awoke and found something ungiving and hard towering over your house, your lover, your dreams.
"Here", of course, is the austere, ungiving waste land Thomas Stearns Eliot defines, describes, and inhabits in the intricate, searing landmark poem written in Switzerland in 1921.
Despite this clearly being a personal work about the playwright's own deep interests, it's an oddly ungiving one for much of its running time.