unglossed

unglossed

(ʌnˈɡlɒst)
adj
without gloss
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
In both the sentences, the words kazzaq and vida remain unglossed to retain their cultural authenticity.
Patrizia Lendinara examines words left unglossed by Aldred, arguing that informed principles are at work here, rather than gaps in his knowledge.
There are careless lapses, such as the listing of a publication date of 1995 (instead of 1978) for Lorde's pivotal poetry collection The Black Unicorn, and an unglossed comment that Lorde could be seen as a "forerunner" of the Black Arts Movement.
"Threap," the sentence's principle verb, is unglossed, but can be speculatively inferred from the context.
On the other hand, many usages that might prove ambiguous or obscure to students remain unglossed: e.g., again in Religio Mediei, mediocrity (in the sense of moderation), oraison (prayer), Hermes Trismegistus and the Corpus Hermeticorum, roundels (steps), cantons (nooks), composition (agreement).
These parts of the novel are filled with unglossed references to the particular streets and parks and corners of downtown Toronto, as other commentators have noted (see, for instance, Suarez 195).
As McKenzie explains, biblical and extra-biblical apocalyptic texts ordinarily rely upon Hebrew scripture for imagery, but the images remain unglossed without the help of an otherworldly entity, often an angel, who explicates the vision's substance (125).
Also the Other's language is incorporated in the narrative in the form of (sometimes unglossed) Greenlandic words and quotations or translating them into Danish in such a way that they reflect the Inughuit way of thinking (19).
In the masque, in the second half of the book, the details of Concordia are similar, but many of them are left unglossed:
(41) Ozick translates the third of these Yiddish words, cheder-yinglach, with a fragmentary afterthought, "Schoolboys," but she leaves the second Yiddish word, mamaloshen (mother-tongue), unglossed, as though this familiar appellation for Yiddish needed no translation, or, given what Edelshtein is saying, as a way of keeping Yiddish itself "a stranger" to Ozick's own readers, the readers of this writer of "Jewish extraction."
The Greek text was often left untranslated and abbreviations such as CA (J U Powell's Collectanea Alexandrina [Oxford 1925] and SH (H Lloyd-Jones & P Parsons, Supplementum Hellenisticum [Berlin 1983]) were left unglossed. He wrote uncompromisingly for experts in Hellenistic poetry.