ungraced

ungraced

(ʌnˈɡreɪst)
adj
deprived of something
References in classic literature ?
``It is well,'' said Prince John, haughtily; ``although unused to such refusals, we will endeavour to digest our banquet as we may, though ungraced by the most successful in arms, and his elected Queen of Beauty.''
For instance, she asks: 'Who has decided--who has the right to decide--for the countless legions of people who were not consulted that the supreme value is a world without insects, even though it be also a sterile world ungraced by the curving wing of a bird in flight?' (41)
Those suspicious of Hersh's story suggested this was evidence that the piece wasn't up to snuff, and ungraced by the notoriously thorough fact checkers at the New Yorker.
As such, the movement of conversion is from an ungraced or less graced state to a more intimate identification with the Christ-self.
ONCE upon a time - in the 50s and 60s - you'd have walked a long way to find a garden devoid of dahlias, or ungraced by gladioli.
There is immensely more to be said, of course, about the "new theologians"' (2) especially about their insistence that there is no such thing as ungraced nature, their contention that the human and natural worlds are always and already suffused with divine grace, and thus their denial that reason operates according to allegedly "independent" norms.
After twelve years of marriage wasn't it the piece you got on the side that reminded you you were still alive?" (18) Here Hassler is able to give us what was suggested in an earlier quotation: "the most horrific deeds must be described in language flat, ugly and normal, 'imprinted with the rhythms and cliches of pop psychology."' To be sure, this is what Balthasar means when he says "Evil can deceive us with a convincing 'realism': in its light, all things appear close up and stripped, in the true-to-life clarity of verismo." Except that here the realism shows for what it truly is: the evil, ungraced view of life's erotic love.
There is an antithesis between the graced and the ungraced at social and personal levels.
"Who has made the decision that sets in motion these chains of poisonings, this ever-widening wave of death that spreads out, like ripples when a pebble is dropped into a still pond?" She asked: "Who has decided-who has the right to decide-for the countless legions of people who were not consulted that the supreme value is a world without insects, even though it be also a sterile world ungraced by the curving wing of a bird in flight?
Although he praises David Hume for his plain style, he thought John Locke went too far in plainness: "The lack of ornament in the prose of this period [Dryden's age] is never perhaps more clearly shown than in the style of Locke, which, though not often absolutely incorrect, is to me, I frankly own, a disgusting style, bald, dull, plebeian, giving indeed the author's meaning, but giving it ungraced with any due apparatus or ministry." (36)
One went to church to get one's "bag of grace" in order to survive in a hostile, ungraced world.