unguent

(redirected from unguents)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

un·guent

 (ŭng′gwənt)
n.
A salve for soothing or healing; an ointment.

[Middle English, from Latin unguentum, from unguere, to anoint.]

un′guen·tar′y (-tĕr′ē) adj.

unguent

(ˈʌŋɡwənt)
n
(Pharmacology) a less common name for an ointment
[C15: from Latin unguentum, from unguere to anoint]
ˈunguentary adj

un•guent

(ˈʌŋ gwənt)

n.
an ointment or salve, esp. when liquid or semiliquid.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin of unguentum salve, ointment, derivative of unguere to smear, anoint]
un′guen•tar′y, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.unguent - semisolid preparation (usually containing a medicine) applied externally as a remedy or for soothing an irritationunguent - semisolid preparation (usually containing a medicine) applied externally as a remedy or for soothing an irritation
arnica - an ointment used in treating bruises
baby oil - an ointment for babies
balsam - an ointment containing a fragrant resin
carron oil - an ointment formerly used to treat burns
cerate - a hard medicated paste made of lard or oil mixed with wax or resin
chrism, chrisom, holy oil, sacramental oil - a consecrated ointment consisting of a mixture of oil and balsam
lip balm - a balm applied to the lips
mentholated salve - a salve containing menthol
mercurial ointment - an ointment containing mercury
curative, cure, therapeutic, remedy - a medicine or therapy that cures disease or relieve pain
zinc ointment - an ointment containing zinc that is used to treat certain skin diseases
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
lanolin, wool fat, wool grease - a yellow viscous animal oil extracted from wool; a mixture of fatty acids and esters; used in some ointments and cosmetics
Translations

unguent

[ˈʌŋgwənt] Nungüento m

unguent

nSalbe f, → Unguentum nt (spec)

un·guent

n. ungüento, medicamento preparado para uso externo.
References in classic literature ?
He studied the science of herbs, the science of unguents; he became an expert in fevers and in contusions, in sprains and abcesses.
Against the bier he leaned two-handled jars of honey and unguents; four proud horses did he then cast upon the pyre, groaning the while he did so.
Yet beware of being too material, when there is any impediment or obstruction in men's wills; for pre-occupation of mind ever requireth preface of speech; like a fomentation to make the unguent enter.
``What devil's deed have they now in the wind?'' said the old hag, murmuring to herself, yet from time to time casting a sidelong and malignant glance at Rebecca; ``but it is easy to guess Bright eyes, black locks, and a skin like paper, ere the priest stains it with his black unguent Ay, it is easy to guess why they send her to this lone turret, whence a shriek could no more be heard than at the depth of five hundred fathoms beneath the earth.
So she put a golden box into his hand, and directed him how to apply the perfumed unguent which it contained, and where to meet her at midnight.
"Are you sure, beautiful Medea," asked Jason, "quite sure, that the unguent in the gold box will prove a remedy against those terrible burns?"
Ancient Egyptians used castor, olive and sesame oils along with copper, lead and red ocher to make cosmetic and dermatological products in the form of unguents, creams, pomades, rouges, powders, and eye and nail paints.
Prior to modern times herbalists would prescribe unguents extracted from the bark and nuts to treat vascular problems such as varicose veins, bleeding haemorrhoids, oedema, and leg ulcers.
Inside the museum is a reconstruction of a medieval apothecary with many bottles that would contain different leaves, bark, seeds, flowers and fruits-dried, ground, or boiled and distilled-to form medicine, ointments and unguents. Surely some of these plants were grown in the garden by the monastery infirmarian.
And now I feel an overwhelming urge to punch her, right on the nose, as she sits in her jacuzzi, slathering herself with unguents, and I sit in mine, slathering my chips in ketchup.
Moreover this same location yielded a gold tali or marriage token, which may suggest the vessels may have contained unguents or perfume of some form used by female members of the community.