unhandsomeness

un·hand·some

 (ŭn-hăn′səm)
adj.
1. Not attractive or beautiful; homely.
2. Not courteous or in good taste; ungracious.

un·hand′some·ly adv.
un·hand′some·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

unhandsomeness

(ʌnˈhænsəmnəs)
n
1. unattractiveness
2. discourtesy
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
If, in Kant's settlement with skepticism, 'reason proves its power to itself, over itself " (as Cavell puts it) by discovering the difference between the mere appearances of which it can have knowledge and the Kantian ding an sich (thing in itself) of which it can't,(9) then Emerson's mourning of the "unhandsomeness" of the world entails, in Cavell's words, the "recognition not of the uncertainty or failure of our knowledge but of our disappointment with its success" (TN 30).
I am and I have: but I do not get, and when I have fancied that I have gotten anything, I found I did not" (E 289).(33) Cavell reads this passage as "an explicit reversal of Kant on knowing," as a continuation of Emerson's project of coming to terms with skepticism and the "unhandsomeness" of the world.