unhealable

unhealable

(ʌnˈhiːləbəl)
adj
not able to be healed
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
In his quintessential essay "Reflections on Exile", Edward Said defines exile as "the unhealable rift forced between a human being and his native place, between the self and its true home".
DABCIs have been healing the unhealable for almost a half a century and you should be proud to stand with DABCI behind your name.
the unhealable rift forced between a human being and native place, between the self and its true home: its essential sadness can never be surmounted." He adds, "Exiles are cut off from their roots, their land, their past...
Exile is "the unhealable rift forced" between an individual and his or her indigenous place (Said Reflection 131), as becoming exiles is to be "cut off from their root, their land, their past" (Said Reflection 140).
Prosecutors accused the suspect of assaulting the Ghanaian and causing him a permanent and unhealable disfigurement in his face.
"Many commentators licked their lips at the prospect of unhealable rifts following what they insisted would be the 'inevitable' remain vote - rifts that would threaten the future of Conservatism.
It is the unhealable rift forced between a human being and a native place, between the self and its true home: its essential sadness can never be surmounted." (30) It situates the exiled person in a strange situation of being perennially "out of place," to refer to the title of Said's personal memoir.
He is helpless not to consider all possible avenues of human engagement, all possible variations of narrative flow, improvising discipline and flaw, genius and torment, what Williams calls in "Dissections" "this unhealable self in myself." He is reminding us that he is writing a poem, that the creative process is ongoing, and that poetry, like so many lives, may be infused with ordinary suffering.
Recalling writing to Prime Minister Modi over the issue seeking action on the Tamil Nadu Assembly resolution, she said that the Central government has not taken any positive steps over this issue has caused unhealable wound."
(8) "Exile [...] is the unhealable rift forced between a human being and a native place, between the self and its true home" ("El exilio [...] es una quiebra incurable causada en el individuo por la perdida del lugar original", [traduccion mia]) (Said, 2000, p.
Exile has been described as an 'unhealable rift forced between a human being and a native place, between the self and its true home' (Said 2000:173), and ideas of displacement, misplacement, and uprootedness have characterized conventional discussions of refugees and migrants (Marrus 1985; Shawcross 1989; Stein 1981).