unhistorical


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un·his·tor·i·cal

 (ŭn′hĭ-stôr′ĭ-kəl, -stŏr′-)
adj.
Taking little or no account of history.
Translations

unhistorical

[ˈʌnhɪsˈtɒrɪkəl] ADJantihistórico, que no tiene nada de histórico

unhistorical

adj (= inaccurate)unhistorisch, ungeschichtlich; (= legendary)legendär
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References in classic literature ?
When Mr Balfour replied to the allegations that the Roman Empire sank under the weight of its military obligations, he said that this was 'wholly unhistorical.
There still faintly beamed from the woman's features something of the freshness, and even the prettiness, of her youth; rendering it probable that the personal charms which Tess could boast of were in main part her mother's gift, and therefore unknightly, unhistorical.
There was always something unhistorical in making such broad judgments about what was, after all, a large, diverse, complex, and evolving institution, and indeed these judgments were sometimes driven by theological partisanship or historiographical metanarrative.
Gnostic Gospels offering alternative accounts of the life of Christ are not suppressed by the church, but are generally left sitting on shelves because they are plainly unhistorical.
Collectively, these distinguished scholars support and amplify the respectfully worded critique that Peter Steinfels offers to the distressingly unhistorical opening paper by Bishop Donald Wuerl.
The Kierkegaard of the vacuum is unhistorical and unreal.
Here again we have a case where a one-sided and unhistorical systematization breaks down.
Apart from giving a stunning portrait of Britain a century and a half ago, Julian Rathbone cracks some splendidly unhistorical jokes at the expense of James Bond, the Enigma coding machine, Gyles Brandreth (who had a distant relative executed for treason in this period) and even his own distant relative, Basil Rathbone, who famously played the Sheriff of Nottingham to Errol Flynn's Robin Hood.
There are unhistorical episodes in Lucan's Civil War, such as the necromancy of Erichtho and the menagerie of Libyan snakes that inflict disgusting deaths on Cato's expedition, which aim to shock, but go to such extremes that they defy belief and provoke laughter and embarrassment.
In view of the importance Yang attaches to the "anxiety of service" he later attributes to Feng Menglong (in chapter four), he might perhaps have paid more attention to this highly remarkable and, for all we know, unhistorical claim.
Dutton also provides a corrective to the unhistorical outlook promulgated in James D.
Simply put, we have three options in considering how to formulate the issue of race in the early modern period: race in the modern sense is present in the Renaissance; race is not applicable to the Renaissance because it is unhistorical to trace the idea back so far; race is relevant for the Renaissance but the concept has to be redefined to make it appropriate for the specific historical context prior to plantation slavery in the Americas.