unhyphenated

unhyphenated

(ʌnˈhaɪfəˌneɪtɪd)
adj
1. (Grammar) without a hyphen
2. (Anthropology & Ethnology) US and Canadian not using a hyphenated term to describe one's cultural or political loyalty (e.g. French-Canadian, African-American)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
A year or two later, in the early 1970s, I discovered the unhyphenated form YWROKEN in both Chambers Twentieth Century Dictionary and the Oxford English Dictionary (OED).
Joris's way of handling these varies a bit, but on the whole he takes the Joycean route and gives us unhyphenated English equivalents, such as "arrowscript" for the last word quoted.
Tolerant: Inclusiveness expressed in the motto E Phiribus Unum, denoting a great melting pot where each wave of new arrivals is melded into unhyphenated Americanism.
While Capshaw analyzes the ways in which some periodicals used the war to strengthen minority cultures, Agnieszka Stasiewicz-Bienkowska sees shifting understandings of Otherness and Selfness in Swedish American children's magazines as a force that strengthened Swedish American children's "unhyphenated American identity" (102).
A new, lovely term: 'Christmasaya'-Christ, Christmas and masaya (happy) all in one unhyphenated word.
A close inspection of his cultural attachments--in language, identity performance, and social ceremony--contradicts some of the common critical perspectives of Hemingway and his literature, which generally characterize him as an unhyphenated American (in a cultural sense) for whom English is a dominant language.
For me this question of the "multiple identifications" that claiming an unhyphenated "Canadian" identity enables is crucial.
And on occasions--just as in England--this failure to imagine this group of Scots as 'truly Scottish', as 'unhyphenated Scots', can lead to violence and sometimes murder.
One was Iraqi-American, one Egyptian-American and one an unhyphenated American.
There's also some psychological consolation that comes from being white in a society that treats white people as "normal" or "unhyphenated" Canadians or Quebecois.
(95) The commission stated bluntly that it "rejects the narrow conception of identity politics as a basis for drawing boundaries." (96) Its underlying assumption seemed to be that all individuals are unhyphenated equals and that considering factors such as race is divisive.
(17.) Note that, in the rhythmic group "Toute la nuit," the first syllable is indicated with tonic stress, and not "nuit," while "la bas" (unhyphenated) gets the correct tonic stress on the monosyllable.