Unicode


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U·ni·code

 (yo͞o′nĭ-kōd′)
n.
A character encoding standard for computer storage and transmission of the letters, characters, and symbols of most languages and writing systems.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Unicode

(ˈjuːnɪˌkəʊd)
n
(Computer Science) computing a character set for all languages
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Major stakeholders such as mobile service providers, media and content producers, civil society organizations, and developers from the tech community have been told by the government to prepare measures for the adoption of the Unicode. All government ministries have already fully migrated to Unicode in April 2019.
However, extended Unicode support isn't quite perfect yet: ToCharacterCode still splits up non-plane-0 characters into surrogate pairs (we're currently working on a fix, which will come in Wolfram Cloud 1.52), and the editor cursor can be moved 'inside' emojis (this will be improved in the longer term).
Emoji are used by 92 percent of the global population online, Unicode says.
But for it to make it to phones and computers, it has to be approved by Unicode. The nonprofit group, mostly made up of people from large tech companies like Apple, Google and Facebook, translates emoji into one standard, so that a person in France, for example, can send an emoji or a text message to a person in the U.S.
In the Unicode 2017 update, the hijab emoji was added, demonstrating how emojis become relevant for different communities.
While the pick-up truck emoji has been shortlisted for a future version of Unicode. The final list of approved emoji will be revealed in early next year.
The additions are expected later this year along with dozens of more inclusive emojis as platforms adopt the Unicode 12.0 standard.
class="MsoNormalINCLUSIVITY class="MsoNormalThe Unicode Consortium sets the standards for emoji compatibility, allowing the symbols to translate across the internet.
The Unicode Consortium said in ablog post: "Emoji 12.0 data has been released, with 59 new emoji and 171 variants for gender and skin tone, this makes a total of 230 emoji including variants."
New emoji are decided on and introduced by a committee in the Unicode Consortium, a California-based nonprofit organization that ensures industry standards for how text is expressed in computing.
Daniel further clarified in another tweet that the goal of redesigning the salad emoji was to stay true to the unicode's description.