unidiomatic

unidiomatic

(ʌnˌɪdɪəˈmætɪk)
adj
(of language) not in a form that feels correct and natural to native speakers of a particular language
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

unidiomatic

adjunidiomatisch
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Everything came across as far more intimate and spontaneous than it possibly could with a large symphony orchestra and conductor, with Paul Lewis' piano contributions now delicate, now busy, and coping with all the often unidiomatic aspects of Mahler's idiosyncratic keyboard-writing as he matched Padmore's visionary growth in intensity towards the end of Um Mitternacht.
The expression 'allegedof' is clearly unidiomatic. In addition, it is important to note that the syntactic structure in which the verb allege occurs is different from that in which accuse occurs, even though they have similar meanings.
Research has documented that the unnatural and unidiomatic nature of papers written by non-native English students is due to a dearth or misuse of formulaic sequences (e.g.
But at the same time, the similarly unidiomatic features of Spanish and Nahuatl here create a rather more harmonious and sensible whole than the pure Nahuatl of the Assumption tocotin.
She is very good as an opera singer, but given a jazz line thrown into the middle of a G & S love ballad, she could not make the shift to a belt that would have made sense of the unidiomatic interruption.
For example, he provides a summary of instances in On the Road in which Kerouac's "unidiomatic sentences" (which have "prompted many to dismiss the book as bad writing") in fact demonstrate his tendency to think in terms of "French syntax and vocabulary" (50) (see the expression "I figured to worry about that," which Melehy notes "borrows from the French 'Je me suis figure,' which may be followed by an infinitive").
Furthermore, Thornbury and Slade (2006) argue that an underuse of formulaic language leaves EFL users "relying on their grammatical knowledge to generate well-formed but essentially unidiomatic language" (p.
The Union Bible, perhaps the most widely-used Protestant text, has John saying: Taichuyou Dao; Daoyu Shen tongzai; Dao jiu shi Shen (4): "At the Great Beginning there was the Tao; Tao and God [Shen--more commonly, Spirit] were in the same place (or existed together); Tao [in fact] was God"--in an unidiomatic back translation.
Eventually it was conceded that parts of the lipogrammatic version of the article were unclear, or at least unidiomatic for the genre.
(5) And it is this strict adherence to the text that has earned RRP criticism for being overly literal: "unidiomatic and lacking in flexibility" (Wells 1916: 401-402), "a literal crib accompanied by a commentary" (Norton 2000: 5), "[the work in its slavish adherence to the Latin original gives more the impression of a gloss than a translation, and, I venture to say, did give that impression even in the fourteenth century" (Paues 1902: lx-lxi).
[All quotes included here come from a lightly edited version of the English translation of the original Arabic document; edits are for punctuation errors (including apostrophes indicating possession, extra spaces, gratuitous end punctuation, and a great many unnecessary commas; some unidiomatic passages have been made slightly clearer.
The book is marred only by an often unidiomatic English prose style that really should have been vetted by a native speaker.

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