unilateral

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u·ni·lat·er·al

 (yo͞o′nə-lăt′ər-əl)
adj.
1. Of, on, relating to, involving, or affecting only one side: "a unilateral advantage in defense" (New Republic).
2. Performed or undertaken by only one side: unilateral disarmament.
3. Obligating only one of two or more parties, nations, or persons, as a contract or an agreement.
4. Emphasizing or recognizing only one side of a subject.
5. Having only one side.
6. Tracing the lineage of one parent only: a unilateral genealogy.
7. Botany Having leaves, flowers, or other parts on one side only.

u′ni·lat′er·al·ly adv.

unilateral

(ˌjuːnɪˈlætərəl)
adj
1. of, having, affecting, or occurring on only one side
2. involving or performed by only one party of several: unilateral disarmament.
3. (Law) law (of contracts, obligations, etc) made by, affecting, or binding one party only and not involving the other party in reciprocal obligations
4. (Botany) botany having or designating parts situated or turned to one side of an axis
5. (Sociology) sociol relating to or tracing the line of descent through ancestors of one sex only. Compare bilateral5
6. (Phonetics & Phonology) phonetics denoting an (l) sound produced on one side of the tongue only
ˌuniˈlateralism, ˌuniˌlaterˈality n
ˌuniˈlaterally adv

u•ni•lat•er•al

(ˌyu nəˈlæt ər əl)

adj.
1. relating to, occurring on, or involving one side only.
2. undertaken or done by or on behalf of one side, party, or faction only; not mutual: unilateral disarmament.
3. having only one side or surface; without a reverse side or inside, as a Möbius strip.
4. Law. pertaining to a contract in which obligation rests on one party only.
5. Bot. having all the parts disposed on one side of an axis, as an inflorescence.
6. through forebears of one sex only, as through either the mother's or father's line. Compare bilateral (def. 5).
[1795–1805; < New Latin ūnilaterālis. See uni-, lateral]
u`ni•lat`er•al′i•ty, n.
u`ni•lat′er•al•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unilateral - involving only one part or side; "unilateral paralysis"; "a unilateral decision"
many-sided, multilateral - having many parts or sides
2.unilateral - tracing descent from either the paternal or the maternal line onlyunilateral - tracing descent from either the paternal or the maternal line only
lineal, direct - in a straight unbroken line of descent from parent to child; "lineal ancestors"; "lineal heirs"; "a direct descendant of the king"; "direct heredity"
Translations
unilateral

unilateral

[ˈjuːnɪˈlætərəl]
A. ADJunilateral
B. CPD unilateral disarmament Ndesarme m unilateral
unilateral nuclear disarmamentdesarme m nuclear unilateral

unilateral

[ˌjuːnɪˈlætərəl] adjunilatéral(e)

unilateral

adj (Jur) → einseitig; (Pol also) → unilateral; unilateral declaration of independenceeinseitige Unabhängigkeitserklärung; to take unilateral action against somebodyeinseitig gegen jdn vorgehen; unilateral (nuclear) disarmamenteinseitige or unilaterale (atomare) Abrüstung

unilateral

[ˌjuːnɪˈlætrl] adjunilaterale

u·ni·lat·e·ral

a. unilateral, rel. a un solo lado.

unilateral

adj unilateral
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This unilaterality in the approaches is not the only lack that Lenin's contribution may help to mitigate when it comes to analyse the national fact.