unillusioned

unillusioned

(ˌʌnɪˈluːʒənd)
adj
literary having or containing no illusions
References in periodicals archive ?
In the later scenes of the play, Lear generalizes from his experiences and articulates a political theory that is unillusioned, even cynical, in its emphasis on the importance of position.
Her work abounds with balefully unillusioned statements on the matter.
His bleak, unillusioned view of the country, while often expressed as savage satire, was tragic at bottom, as was his take on human existence itself, although intermittently transgured by eeting shafts of spiritual hope.
Among the pieties rejected is the idea of human perfectibility; the pragmatist's conception of human nature is unillusioned. Among the conceptualisms rejected are moral, legal, and political theory when offered to guide legal and other official decisionmaking." Richard Posner, Law, Pragmatism, and Democracy (Harvard University Press, 2003) at 3.
Perhaps what attracts us most to flamenco, as it does to the blues, is the note of unillusioned affirmation of humanity which it embodies.
As Christopher Hitchens writes in his Preface, this is 'an idiosyncratic, unillusioned tour of the sixties that has few if any rivals', idiosyncratic because the worlds of politics and international crises seem to happen off-stage.
And viewed from the perspective of a bright, unillusioned child, the emigre experience became a source of rich ironies.
Posner is deeply skeptical of this project because he has what he calls an "unillusioned understanding of human nature." (5) Invoking Darwin, Posner states that "human beings are merely clever animals," that "our intelligence is primarily instrumental rather than contemplative," and that "Darwin's picture of nature is bleak; it is dog eat dog in virtually a literal sense; the adaptionist process that produced us is genocidal." (6) "The problem of democracy," as Posner sees it, "is to manage conflict among persons who, often arguing from incompatible premises, cannot overcome their differences by discussion." (7) Pragmatic liberalism, therefore, sees voting and the action of elected officials as a matter of competitive interest.
Galbraith, both an American ambassador to New Delhi and an unillusioned friend of India) could have pointed out, after 1977 there was the democracy common to both countries.
"A European city of culture, and a city of European culture, should rightly be thought of as a place where a great deal of deflation goes on, a great deal of sceptical and unillusioned thinking that can penetrate the pretensions of all claims to final versions of the human comedy or tragedy.
(27.) In Writing the English Republic: Poetry, Rhetoric, and Politics 1627-1660 (Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1999), 243-98, David Norbrook similarly notes Marvell's protosecularist aesthetic (265-66, 290-91), his lack of a "consistent ideological pattern" in the Commonwealth and Protectorate poems (249), and his Horatian Ode's fusion of an "unillusioned realism" that is "Hobbesian in spirit" with "an activist republicanism" (264).