uninhabitable

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un·in·hab·it·a·ble

 (ŭn′ĭn-hăb′ĭ-tə-bəl)
adj.
Unfit for habitation: an uninhabitable island.

un′in·hab′it·a·bil′i·ty n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

uninhabitable

(ˌʌnɪnˈhæbɪtəbəl)
adj
not capable of being lived in
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.uninhabitable - not fit for habitationuninhabitable - not fit for habitation    
unlivable, unliveable - unfit or unsuitable to live in or with; "unlivable substandard housing"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

uninhabitable

[ˈʌnɪnˈhæbɪtəbl] ADJinhabitable
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

uninhabitable

[ˌʌnɪnˈhæbɪtəbəl] adjinhabitable
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

uninhabitable

adjunbewohnbar
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

uninhabitable

[ˌʌnɪnˈhæbɪtəbl] adjinabitabile
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
What television ultimately monitors and monitors against, according to Cavell, is "the growing uninhabitability of the world, the irreversible pollution of the earth, a fear displaced from the world onto its monitor" (95).
(362.) Anderson, Cities Inside Out, supra note 25, at 1107; see also Larson, supra note 315, at 185-93 (discussing the health risks of improvised private waste disposal); Michelle Wilde Anderson & Juan Carlos Cancino, Uninhabitability as a Public Policy Objective (2014) (unpublished manuscript) (on file with author).
As Petersen (2007) suggested, "We can understand it [supervision] as category boundary work, where processes of inclusion and exclusion take place, and where the abject, that which signifies the zone of uninhabitability or the unthinkable, continuously wavers on the horizon (Butler, 1997, pp.
Where there is an ungrieved loss in drag performance ..., perhaps it is a loss that is refused and incorporated in the performed identification, one that reiterates a gendered idealization and its radical uninhabitability" (234-35).
(7) The Otherworld also relates to Savoy's application of Julia Kristeva's 'abject' to American Gothic literature as signifying 'a domain of impossibility and uninhabitability, associated with betwixt-and-between conditions where death keeps invading life.' (8) Characterised by blood, excrement, vomit, and other bodily fluids, the Otherworld disturbingly transgresses the boundary between inside and outside.